Pimps and 'mobstaz' in public schools

Carol Brown
If you've relaxed your spelling standards because of the spell check feature on your computer, consider this: Schools are now teaching students how to spell words incorrectly - and inappropriate words, at that.

If you're wondering if this has anything to do with Common Core, which reeks of the inappropriate, it does.

Fourth grade students in Vermilion Parish, La. were given a homework assignment that included words like "Po Pimp" and "mobstaz," but school officials said the worksheet was age appropriate based on an education website affiliated with Common Core education standards.

This latest issue with common core curriculum came to light when parent Brittney Badeaux overheard her son saying words while doing his homework that shocked her.

"I try to instill values in my son," parent Brittney Badeaux told Fox News. "My goal is for him to ultimately to become a great man, a family man, a well-rounded man. And now my son wants to know what a pimp is."

Badeaux was helping her 9-year-old son with his homework when she heard him say the words "Po Pimp" and "mobstaz."

"I couldn't believe it at first - hearing him read it to me," she told Fox News. "So I looked at the paper and read the entire article. It was filled with Ebonics." (snip)

"It was really inappropriate for my child," Badeaux said. "He doesn't' know what a pimp or mobster is."

She also took issue with the school sending home a worksheet that intentionally misspelled words.

"I try to teach him morals and respect and to speak correctly," she said. "It's hard for a fourth grader to understand Ebonics when you're trying to teach him how to spell and write correctly."

Naturally, Common Core's "standards" don't give a hint of any of this madness.

The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects ("the Standards") are the culmination of an extended, broad-based effort to fulfill the charge issued by the states to create the next generation of K-12 standards in order to help ensure that all students are college and career ready in literacy no later than the end of high school.

I'd say this fourth grade lesson was not putting Mrs. Badeaux's child on a path toward literacy. Although, they do say "no later than the end of high school," so perhaps there's still time!

The degradation of our society continues apace. But not to worry. It must be good. You know what the Democrats say: It's for the children.

If you've relaxed your spelling standards because of the spell check feature on your computer, consider this: Schools are now teaching students how to spell words incorrectly - and inappropriate words, at that.

If you're wondering if this has anything to do with Common Core, which reeks of the inappropriate, it does.

Fourth grade students in Vermilion Parish, La. were given a homework assignment that included words like "Po Pimp" and "mobstaz," but school officials said the worksheet was age appropriate based on an education website affiliated with Common Core education standards.

This latest issue with common core curriculum came to light when parent Brittney Badeaux overheard her son saying words while doing his homework that shocked her.

"I try to instill values in my son," parent Brittney Badeaux told Fox News. "My goal is for him to ultimately to become a great man, a family man, a well-rounded man. And now my son wants to know what a pimp is."

Badeaux was helping her 9-year-old son with his homework when she heard him say the words "Po Pimp" and "mobstaz."

"I couldn't believe it at first - hearing him read it to me," she told Fox News. "So I looked at the paper and read the entire article. It was filled with Ebonics." (snip)

"It was really inappropriate for my child," Badeaux said. "He doesn't' know what a pimp or mobster is."

She also took issue with the school sending home a worksheet that intentionally misspelled words.

"I try to teach him morals and respect and to speak correctly," she said. "It's hard for a fourth grader to understand Ebonics when you're trying to teach him how to spell and write correctly."

Naturally, Common Core's "standards" don't give a hint of any of this madness.

The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects ("the Standards") are the culmination of an extended, broad-based effort to fulfill the charge issued by the states to create the next generation of K-12 standards in order to help ensure that all students are college and career ready in literacy no later than the end of high school.

I'd say this fourth grade lesson was not putting Mrs. Badeaux's child on a path toward literacy. Although, they do say "no later than the end of high school," so perhaps there's still time!

The degradation of our society continues apace. But not to worry. It must be good. You know what the Democrats say: It's for the children.