Parents of teens who trashed former NFLer's house threaten to sue

Rick Moran
Well, it's no surprise that these kids would break into the vacation home of retired NFL player Brian Holloway and trash the place considering their parents response to this lawlessness.

They want to sue Holloway for posting their kids' pics on social media.

An out-of-control party destroyed the vacation home of former NFL star Brian Holloway, and he wanted to hold the partygoers responsible. But when Holloway fingered the culprits over social media, some irate parents threatened to sue him.

Around 300 teenagers broke into the former football star's vacation home and threw a massive party, trashing the house and posting their exploits on social media. The party caused about $20,000 worth of damage. (Via ABC)

Holloway was staying at his primary home in Lutz, Fla. when his son alerted him to the tweets about the party. Shocked, Holloway called the cops and watched the drama unfold over Twitter.

"I was following the tweets and you can see the conversation go from 'This is the greatest party ever, I can't believe we broke in here' ... to 'Oh my god the cops are here, run to the woods and get rid of all the drugs.'" (Via CNN)

In the aftermath of the party, Holloway took to social media to hold the partiers accountable.

Holloway started a website and a Facebook group titled Help Me Save 300, with the stated goal of reforming the teenagers responsible for the party. He reposted photos and tweets taken by the partygoers, and implored them to redeem their actions by helping him clean up his house.

Only one kid who was actually at the destructive party was among the volunteers who offered to help Holloway out. What's more, Holloway says some of the kid's parents are actually threatening legal action if he doesn't take down his site.

"Some complained that this will ruin their kids' college plans. Others have threatened me, saying 'Take my kid's name down or I'm gonna press charges against you.' ...  If that were one of my children, they would be doing a year's worth of apologizing." (Via New York Post)

Holloway hasn't decided whether or not to press charges against the partygoers, but he tells Gothamist he's not intimidated by the parent's threats.

"They have so much documented evidence, the only term I can use to describe what is going to happen to these teens is 'shock-and-awe.' And how do you intimidate me? ... I've lined up against Lawrence Taylor!"

Instead of talking to Holloway, they should be talking to their kids. Their child commits the crime of breaking and entering, vandalism, willful destruction of property and they have the gall to demand that Holloway not seek restitution of some sort?

It's too bad we no longer allow the stock to be used as punishment. If we did, I'd put the parents of those kids in first and allow the community to throw rotten fruit at them.



Well, it's no surprise that these kids would break into the vacation home of retired NFL player Brian Holloway and trash the place considering their parents response to this lawlessness.

They want to sue Holloway for posting their kids' pics on social media.

An out-of-control party destroyed the vacation home of former NFL star Brian Holloway, and he wanted to hold the partygoers responsible. But when Holloway fingered the culprits over social media, some irate parents threatened to sue him.

Around 300 teenagers broke into the former football star's vacation home and threw a massive party, trashing the house and posting their exploits on social media. The party caused about $20,000 worth of damage. (Via ABC)

Holloway was staying at his primary home in Lutz, Fla. when his son alerted him to the tweets about the party. Shocked, Holloway called the cops and watched the drama unfold over Twitter.

"I was following the tweets and you can see the conversation go from 'This is the greatest party ever, I can't believe we broke in here' ... to 'Oh my god the cops are here, run to the woods and get rid of all the drugs.'" (Via CNN)

In the aftermath of the party, Holloway took to social media to hold the partiers accountable.

Holloway started a website and a Facebook group titled Help Me Save 300, with the stated goal of reforming the teenagers responsible for the party. He reposted photos and tweets taken by the partygoers, and implored them to redeem their actions by helping him clean up his house.

Only one kid who was actually at the destructive party was among the volunteers who offered to help Holloway out. What's more, Holloway says some of the kid's parents are actually threatening legal action if he doesn't take down his site.

"Some complained that this will ruin their kids' college plans. Others have threatened me, saying 'Take my kid's name down or I'm gonna press charges against you.' ...  If that were one of my children, they would be doing a year's worth of apologizing." (Via New York Post)

Holloway hasn't decided whether or not to press charges against the partygoers, but he tells Gothamist he's not intimidated by the parent's threats.

"They have so much documented evidence, the only term I can use to describe what is going to happen to these teens is 'shock-and-awe.' And how do you intimidate me? ... I've lined up against Lawrence Taylor!"

Instead of talking to Holloway, they should be talking to their kids. Their child commits the crime of breaking and entering, vandalism, willful destruction of property and they have the gall to demand that Holloway not seek restitution of some sort?

It's too bad we no longer allow the stock to be used as punishment. If we did, I'd put the parents of those kids in first and allow the community to throw rotten fruit at them.