Student who balked at wearing RFID chip returns to school

In the fall of 2012, the Northside Independent School District, in San Antonio, Texas required middle and high school students to wear a "tracking" chip while on campus. And not just a passive RFID (Radio-frequency identification) chip, these second generation RFID chips include a battery that transmits a radio signal for constant location monitoring of the students. Sophomore Andrea Hernandez, a Christian, refused to wear the  RFID chip implanted within the school ID badge that hung around her neck, citing deep concerns about religious freedom and privacy issues.

The iconic Japanese proverb, deru kugi wa utareru, reminds us "the nail that sticks out gets hammered down." Not surprisingly,  Andrea was expelled from the school.

Here is the original article from American Thinker from October 7, 2012.

This week there's a follow up article from the indomitable Bob Unruh at World Net Daily:

A student who was expelled from her magnet school program when she refused the district's plan to microchip students is being reinstated after the district dropped the student-tracking strategy.

Andrea Hernandez was defended by the Rutherford Institute against the Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas.

Constitutional attorney and institute president John W. Whitehead said Hernandez is returning this fall to the John Jay High School's Science and Engineering Academy. Her first day back will be Aug. 26.

After a long court fight, district officials announced they would stop using the RFID tracking badges. They cited low participation rates and negative publicity.

"Whether you're talking about NSA surveillance, SWAT team raids on organic farmers, or young people being chipped, tracked and treated like criminals, it's all too easy to get discouraged when faced with a government that not only refuses to listen but steadfastly continues to undermine the Constitution," said Whitehead.

Two lessons can be reinforced from this all too frequent conflict between sophisticated technology and our 4th Amendment right to privacy. First, that a free and unfettered press remains essential to bring  "sunlight" to these stories. Only tyrannical government, bent on controlling the news, would want to "license" journalists. Second, that individuals like Andrea, with conviction, faith, and courage still make a difference in 21st century America. While so many of our freedoms are under attack, Andrea and young men and women like her give us all hope for a better tomorrow for this country.



In the fall of 2012, the Northside Independent School District, in San Antonio, Texas required middle and high school students to wear a "tracking" chip while on campus. And not just a passive RFID (Radio-frequency identification) chip, these second generation RFID chips include a battery that transmits a radio signal for constant location monitoring of the students. Sophomore Andrea Hernandez, a Christian, refused to wear the  RFID chip implanted within the school ID badge that hung around her neck, citing deep concerns about religious freedom and privacy issues.

The iconic Japanese proverb, deru kugi wa utareru, reminds us "the nail that sticks out gets hammered down." Not surprisingly,  Andrea was expelled from the school.

Here is the original article from American Thinker from October 7, 2012.

This week there's a follow up article from the indomitable Bob Unruh at World Net Daily:

A student who was expelled from her magnet school program when she refused the district's plan to microchip students is being reinstated after the district dropped the student-tracking strategy.

Andrea Hernandez was defended by the Rutherford Institute against the Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas.

Constitutional attorney and institute president John W. Whitehead said Hernandez is returning this fall to the John Jay High School's Science and Engineering Academy. Her first day back will be Aug. 26.

After a long court fight, district officials announced they would stop using the RFID tracking badges. They cited low participation rates and negative publicity.

"Whether you're talking about NSA surveillance, SWAT team raids on organic farmers, or young people being chipped, tracked and treated like criminals, it's all too easy to get discouraged when faced with a government that not only refuses to listen but steadfastly continues to undermine the Constitution," said Whitehead.

Two lessons can be reinforced from this all too frequent conflict between sophisticated technology and our 4th Amendment right to privacy. First, that a free and unfettered press remains essential to bring  "sunlight" to these stories. Only tyrannical government, bent on controlling the news, would want to "license" journalists. Second, that individuals like Andrea, with conviction, faith, and courage still make a difference in 21st century America. While so many of our freedoms are under attack, Andrea and young men and women like her give us all hope for a better tomorrow for this country.



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