Martin Luther King Was Republican

Karin McQuillan
It is time for a new Civil Rights Movement to continue the work of Dr. King, which has been betrayed by the Democratic Party.  The new Civil Rights Movement will be just like the old one: fighting for a colorblind society.  Martin Luther King was a Republican.  The original March on Washington was organized mostly by black Republicans.  The Civil Rights Acts of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965 were passed mostly by Republicans.  And it is Republicans who have remained true through the years to Dr. King's call to judge men by the content of their character.

Democrats treat blacks like they can't finish high school, get a job, start a family after marriage, and support themselves like capable adults.  Instead they have to be taken care of their entire life.  No wonder black conservatives talk of the "Democrat Plantation."  Once you've destroyed a person's character, as permanent welfare does, you have left nothing.

Personal initiative, responsibility, and hard work are the only paths to success.  Dr. King lived these truths.  They are G-d given gifts.  They are liberated by our free-enterprise system.  Government cannot give those gifts but it can destroy them.  It's time to stop the collateral damage of millions of wasted lives from the War on Poverty.  The liberal Nanny State is depriving our entire country of a future.  Republicans have a better way, and we should be joining with black conservatives to show that way to the black community.

Here are some hopeful words in memory of Martin Luther King from some lesser known black conservatives.  Many of them, like Dr. King, are church people, basing their politics on a moral message.  They are not a tiny handful, and they are not tokens, they are the leaders of a new Civil Rights movement, being given a voice by the Internet.  They will be heard, because they are speaking the truth. 

Milton Reid, at his blog Black Quill and Ink:

 "....judge a man by the content of his character not by the color of his skin." Ironically, of all Americans, Kings words ring the most hollow with black Americans. As a black American I am sad and often disgusted at black hypocrisy. As a child of the 60s and the Civil Rights movement, I saw blacks, filled with pride and the desire to rid America of racism and segregation, march in the streets and allowed themselves to be beaten and attacked by dogs all with the goal of making America live up to its promise of freedom and liberty for all Americans. Now, forty years later, I see blacks completely ignore the content of a man's character in order to show favor to him simply due to the color of his skin.

In 2008 I did not vote for Barack Obama and it was an easy decision to make. While like many black Americans, I longed to see the day that a black would reside in the White House, I refused, however, to surrender my ethics, morals and values, most of which are shared by a large percentage of the black community, in order to make this happen. In Barack Obama I saw a man who did not share my values, morals and certainly not my love of country. ...

I would not support a person, just because he was black, who subscribed to economic theories, beliefs and ideas that are contrary to the fundamental underpinnings of what made America great; small government, capitalism, freedom of religion and a free economy.

I would not support a person just because he is black, who surrounded himself with people who are or were at best hostile to America (Bill Ayers, Bernadine Dorn, Frank Marshall Davis, et al)  and at worse who are sworn to bring about its destruction (Muslim Brotherhood).

Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. at townhall.com:

"What would Dr. King do today?" King would most likely be a social conservative. ... He would not ask big government's permission to confront the Goliaths of poverty, crime, drug abuse and teen pregnancy that stalk urban America.

As any pastor leading a multiethnic congregation knows, it is tough to teach people from different backgrounds to get along. Unless there is a common set a values-... found in the Judeo-Christian tradition: that all humans bear God's image and are thus equal in value and worthy of liberty.

This is not the domain of government; it's the business of the Church. In recent days Bill O'Reilly has listed a series of challenges to the black community to take responsibility to turn its fortunes around. His analysis is right, but if this transformation is going to be accomplished in the next 40 years, it will take the multi-ethnic, unified Church to make it happen.  I am committed to making this change happen. I know I also speak for thousands of church leaders. We simply need a plan.

Robert Woodson, Vice President of the NAACP in Pennsylvania when Dr. King was assassinated, President of the National Center for Neighborhood Enterprise, was invited to speak at the Heritage Foundation on Dr. King's legacy:

Dr. King spoke out against the violence of the Ku Klux Klan, but he also spoke out with equal vigor against the retaliatory violence of the Black Panther Party. ... When he sought to remove the barriers confronting black America, he did not seek to then describe us as victims. There are two ways that you can prevent someone from competing. One is to deny them the opportunity to compete by law, which laws of segregation and discrimination did. The second way to deny them the opportunity to compete is to tell them they do not have to compete, that they can just sit back and government will do it for them.

... Dr. King believed that everybody was capable of enjoying God's redemptive powers. He did not attack his enemies. Like Abraham Lincoln, he believed that the best way to destroy your enemy is to make him your friend. And Dr. King was motivated by the best traditions of the black community, in that he believed that personal conduct was important. But we saw the decline of the black community occur precisely at a time when we had the greatest opportunity. When the doors were opening up, instead of saying to black America, "Open the doors now and initiate self-help efforts to propel you further than you were," we told our young people, "Because of past discriminatory practices, you are society's victim and you have a right to restitution. You have not only a right to a level playing field and a right to opportunities, but you have a right to ten percent of the trophies." And as a consequence, this whole idea of victimization began to occur.

Remember, up until 1959, only nine percent of black families had illegitimate children, and 13 percent of white families in 1959 had children where the mother never married the father. ... Black America has a rich tradition of moral rectitude and personal responsibility.

Dr. King understood this and he tried to bring that message forward. For instance, in 1787 the black community established our first welfare system at Mother Bethel's Church in Philadelphia, when we had our own Free Society of Blacks. And our own welfare system would not give welfare to those who were poor because of their own thoughtlessness and irresponsibility.

Tea Party activist Lisa Fritsch at lisafritsch.com:

"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'"

Amen. But it is blacks in the country who have yet to embrace all that the dream and true equality means. It is the black community who has failed to make good on the foundation laid by Dr. King: his speeches, principles, and path for freedom in America.  For it was also Martin Luther King who sought justice through love and peace saying, "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that."

Today's so called black leadership has abandoned the dream. ...This black leadership operates on promoting darkness, rather than shepherding their community towards the light.

Michael Massie who blogs at The Daily Rant:

... were Dr. King still alive, what is not open for debate are his position ... on drinking from the cup of bitterness and resentment that so many blissfully imbibe from today.

And when we read:"In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. ...We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. ...The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people..." (I have a dream speech, Aug. 28, 1963)

It gives us some indication of what he may have thought or said to the Jacksons, Sharptons, Farrakhans or Julian Bonds of today...What would he say of his dream today - when we examine the devastating effect personal and social irresponsibility has had on the black family? We can but wonder how he would feel about black gangs, drugs, educational largesse, generational welfare and the damning results of the Great Society Initiative.

Perhaps instead of preening for photo-ops, the feckless fantasia called liberal politicians and black leadership would better spend their time trying to remember exactly what Dr. King's dream was - because their version of same more closely resembles the nightmare of nocturnal occlusion.

V.P. Cheney's aide, Ron Christie's advice to Republicans from his book, Black in the White House:

"We maintain that these leaders (the Jesse Jacksons and the Al Sharptons represented the "shakedown cruise" element of black America. Finding discrimination and trouble behind every corner, these folks were extremely successful in extorting ridiculous sums of money from government and corporations that would oddly find their way into the leaders' pockets rather than the constituencies they claimed to represent."

... why I wrote the book called "Black in the White House", to give a different characterization of Bush administration and these pro-growth policies.  If you look at the substance and you look at the issues, the president came in and he said that he wanted to fight the self-bigotry of low expectations.

Milt Thomas blogs at myouthouse.net:

As a Black man...and one who grew up in the Deep South, during the sunset of Jim Crow and the rise of King's Nonviolent Social Change, I must admit, at times, my shame of being part of a race that appears to be doing all it can to prove being unworthy of all it has gained, since Lincoln's emancipating decree.  And nothing could be more evidencing of this than the reaction of Blacks, following the Zimmerman verdict, some weeks ago.

Despite this being a country of laws-Thank God!!-and despite Blacks, for decades, having been on the receiving end of lawless mob behavior, we took it upon ourselves to decry the Zimmerman verdict invalid and his freedom an act of brazened racism-laws, judge, and jury be damned.

As the weeks rolled past, we heard calls for the ethereal "conversation on race," harkening back to a comment made by Eric Holder-another despotic activist who, like Obama, would be pleased to see the country spiral into a state of emergent civil unrest.  Such an eruption would force their hand(s) to declare martial law and justify their further trashing of the very document they both are sworn to preserve and protect-the Constitution of the United States.

What Whites fail to realize is that, whenever Blacks and the Media advocate this "conversation on race," Blacks are speaking in code.  The truth of their intention is that, during such an engagement, Whites are only to be SEEN...not heard.  It is code to White to "SIT!!  STAY!!!!!!"  You have no voice. You simply are to shut up and take OUR beating for having been the descendants of men who did only what Blacks would have done, were the tables turned.  This is evidenced by how Blacks ultimately have become America's superordinate purveyors of racism and bigotry.

Think about it.  Ever since the whole "diversity" initiative was launched, who is, now, relegated to the "back of the bus"?  It is Whites and, more appropriately, White males.  And political correctness has forbade them from any response in their defense.  After all, such a response would validate their racism.

Since LBJ's creation of the Great Society, Blacks have been transformed into America's "children," incapable of fending for themselves in a free society, inasmuch as "freedom" was never meant to be free of responsibility.  And, sadly, in the hands of America's children, fire has been placed in the form of exotic entitlement.  And it has turned the once victims of racism and bigotry into a race of bigots and racist.  This transformation has rendered Black skin as the arbiter of social infractions and is used to shackle and restrain all those not of the spade that is never called what it is:  Shameful.

I hope AT readers will find reading these black conservatives as cheering as I did --  these are the honest and constructive voices the state media screens out in favor of the Al Sharptons and Barack Obamas.  Have fun looking up more of these courageous people in honor of the 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther King's 1963 Civil Rights March.  It is a time to count our blessings, pray for what we can accomplish together in the coming years, and be proud of what we Republicans accomplished all those years ago.

It is time for a new Civil Rights Movement to continue the work of Dr. King, which has been betrayed by the Democratic Party.  The new Civil Rights Movement will be just like the old one: fighting for a colorblind society.  Martin Luther King was a Republican.  The original March on Washington was organized mostly by black Republicans.  The Civil Rights Acts of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1965 were passed mostly by Republicans.  And it is Republicans who have remained true through the years to Dr. King's call to judge men by the content of their character.

Democrats treat blacks like they can't finish high school, get a job, start a family after marriage, and support themselves like capable adults.  Instead they have to be taken care of their entire life.  No wonder black conservatives talk of the "Democrat Plantation."  Once you've destroyed a person's character, as permanent welfare does, you have left nothing.

Personal initiative, responsibility, and hard work are the only paths to success.  Dr. King lived these truths.  They are G-d given gifts.  They are liberated by our free-enterprise system.  Government cannot give those gifts but it can destroy them.  It's time to stop the collateral damage of millions of wasted lives from the War on Poverty.  The liberal Nanny State is depriving our entire country of a future.  Republicans have a better way, and we should be joining with black conservatives to show that way to the black community.

Here are some hopeful words in memory of Martin Luther King from some lesser known black conservatives.  Many of them, like Dr. King, are church people, basing their politics on a moral message.  They are not a tiny handful, and they are not tokens, they are the leaders of a new Civil Rights movement, being given a voice by the Internet.  They will be heard, because they are speaking the truth. 

Milton Reid, at his blog Black Quill and Ink:

 "....judge a man by the content of his character not by the color of his skin." Ironically, of all Americans, Kings words ring the most hollow with black Americans. As a black American I am sad and often disgusted at black hypocrisy. As a child of the 60s and the Civil Rights movement, I saw blacks, filled with pride and the desire to rid America of racism and segregation, march in the streets and allowed themselves to be beaten and attacked by dogs all with the goal of making America live up to its promise of freedom and liberty for all Americans. Now, forty years later, I see blacks completely ignore the content of a man's character in order to show favor to him simply due to the color of his skin.

In 2008 I did not vote for Barack Obama and it was an easy decision to make. While like many black Americans, I longed to see the day that a black would reside in the White House, I refused, however, to surrender my ethics, morals and values, most of which are shared by a large percentage of the black community, in order to make this happen. In Barack Obama I saw a man who did not share my values, morals and certainly not my love of country. ...

I would not support a person, just because he was black, who subscribed to economic theories, beliefs and ideas that are contrary to the fundamental underpinnings of what made America great; small government, capitalism, freedom of religion and a free economy.

I would not support a person just because he is black, who surrounded himself with people who are or were at best hostile to America (Bill Ayers, Bernadine Dorn, Frank Marshall Davis, et al)  and at worse who are sworn to bring about its destruction (Muslim Brotherhood).

Bishop Harry R. Jackson, Jr. at townhall.com:

"What would Dr. King do today?" King would most likely be a social conservative. ... He would not ask big government's permission to confront the Goliaths of poverty, crime, drug abuse and teen pregnancy that stalk urban America.

As any pastor leading a multiethnic congregation knows, it is tough to teach people from different backgrounds to get along. Unless there is a common set a values-... found in the Judeo-Christian tradition: that all humans bear God's image and are thus equal in value and worthy of liberty.

This is not the domain of government; it's the business of the Church. In recent days Bill O'Reilly has listed a series of challenges to the black community to take responsibility to turn its fortunes around. His analysis is right, but if this transformation is going to be accomplished in the next 40 years, it will take the multi-ethnic, unified Church to make it happen.  I am committed to making this change happen. I know I also speak for thousands of church leaders. We simply need a plan.

Robert Woodson, Vice President of the NAACP in Pennsylvania when Dr. King was assassinated, President of the National Center for Neighborhood Enterprise, was invited to speak at the Heritage Foundation on Dr. King's legacy:

Dr. King spoke out against the violence of the Ku Klux Klan, but he also spoke out with equal vigor against the retaliatory violence of the Black Panther Party. ... When he sought to remove the barriers confronting black America, he did not seek to then describe us as victims. There are two ways that you can prevent someone from competing. One is to deny them the opportunity to compete by law, which laws of segregation and discrimination did. The second way to deny them the opportunity to compete is to tell them they do not have to compete, that they can just sit back and government will do it for them.

... Dr. King believed that everybody was capable of enjoying God's redemptive powers. He did not attack his enemies. Like Abraham Lincoln, he believed that the best way to destroy your enemy is to make him your friend. And Dr. King was motivated by the best traditions of the black community, in that he believed that personal conduct was important. But we saw the decline of the black community occur precisely at a time when we had the greatest opportunity. When the doors were opening up, instead of saying to black America, "Open the doors now and initiate self-help efforts to propel you further than you were," we told our young people, "Because of past discriminatory practices, you are society's victim and you have a right to restitution. You have not only a right to a level playing field and a right to opportunities, but you have a right to ten percent of the trophies." And as a consequence, this whole idea of victimization began to occur.

Remember, up until 1959, only nine percent of black families had illegitimate children, and 13 percent of white families in 1959 had children where the mother never married the father. ... Black America has a rich tradition of moral rectitude and personal responsibility.

Dr. King understood this and he tried to bring that message forward. For instance, in 1787 the black community established our first welfare system at Mother Bethel's Church in Philadelphia, when we had our own Free Society of Blacks. And our own welfare system would not give welfare to those who were poor because of their own thoughtlessness and irresponsibility.

Tea Party activist Lisa Fritsch at lisafritsch.com:

"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'"

Amen. But it is blacks in the country who have yet to embrace all that the dream and true equality means. It is the black community who has failed to make good on the foundation laid by Dr. King: his speeches, principles, and path for freedom in America.  For it was also Martin Luther King who sought justice through love and peace saying, "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that."

Today's so called black leadership has abandoned the dream. ...This black leadership operates on promoting darkness, rather than shepherding their community towards the light.

Michael Massie who blogs at The Daily Rant:

... were Dr. King still alive, what is not open for debate are his position ... on drinking from the cup of bitterness and resentment that so many blissfully imbibe from today.

And when we read:"In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. ...We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. ...The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people..." (I have a dream speech, Aug. 28, 1963)

It gives us some indication of what he may have thought or said to the Jacksons, Sharptons, Farrakhans or Julian Bonds of today...What would he say of his dream today - when we examine the devastating effect personal and social irresponsibility has had on the black family? We can but wonder how he would feel about black gangs, drugs, educational largesse, generational welfare and the damning results of the Great Society Initiative.

Perhaps instead of preening for photo-ops, the feckless fantasia called liberal politicians and black leadership would better spend their time trying to remember exactly what Dr. King's dream was - because their version of same more closely resembles the nightmare of nocturnal occlusion.

V.P. Cheney's aide, Ron Christie's advice to Republicans from his book, Black in the White House:

"We maintain that these leaders (the Jesse Jacksons and the Al Sharptons represented the "shakedown cruise" element of black America. Finding discrimination and trouble behind every corner, these folks were extremely successful in extorting ridiculous sums of money from government and corporations that would oddly find their way into the leaders' pockets rather than the constituencies they claimed to represent."

... why I wrote the book called "Black in the White House", to give a different characterization of Bush administration and these pro-growth policies.  If you look at the substance and you look at the issues, the president came in and he said that he wanted to fight the self-bigotry of low expectations.

Milt Thomas blogs at myouthouse.net:

As a Black man...and one who grew up in the Deep South, during the sunset of Jim Crow and the rise of King's Nonviolent Social Change, I must admit, at times, my shame of being part of a race that appears to be doing all it can to prove being unworthy of all it has gained, since Lincoln's emancipating decree.  And nothing could be more evidencing of this than the reaction of Blacks, following the Zimmerman verdict, some weeks ago.

Despite this being a country of laws-Thank God!!-and despite Blacks, for decades, having been on the receiving end of lawless mob behavior, we took it upon ourselves to decry the Zimmerman verdict invalid and his freedom an act of brazened racism-laws, judge, and jury be damned.

As the weeks rolled past, we heard calls for the ethereal "conversation on race," harkening back to a comment made by Eric Holder-another despotic activist who, like Obama, would be pleased to see the country spiral into a state of emergent civil unrest.  Such an eruption would force their hand(s) to declare martial law and justify their further trashing of the very document they both are sworn to preserve and protect-the Constitution of the United States.

What Whites fail to realize is that, whenever Blacks and the Media advocate this "conversation on race," Blacks are speaking in code.  The truth of their intention is that, during such an engagement, Whites are only to be SEEN...not heard.  It is code to White to "SIT!!  STAY!!!!!!"  You have no voice. You simply are to shut up and take OUR beating for having been the descendants of men who did only what Blacks would have done, were the tables turned.  This is evidenced by how Blacks ultimately have become America's superordinate purveyors of racism and bigotry.

Think about it.  Ever since the whole "diversity" initiative was launched, who is, now, relegated to the "back of the bus"?  It is Whites and, more appropriately, White males.  And political correctness has forbade them from any response in their defense.  After all, such a response would validate their racism.

Since LBJ's creation of the Great Society, Blacks have been transformed into America's "children," incapable of fending for themselves in a free society, inasmuch as "freedom" was never meant to be free of responsibility.  And, sadly, in the hands of America's children, fire has been placed in the form of exotic entitlement.  And it has turned the once victims of racism and bigotry into a race of bigots and racist.  This transformation has rendered Black skin as the arbiter of social infractions and is used to shackle and restrain all those not of the spade that is never called what it is:  Shameful.

I hope AT readers will find reading these black conservatives as cheering as I did --  these are the honest and constructive voices the state media screens out in favor of the Al Sharptons and Barack Obamas.  Have fun looking up more of these courageous people in honor of the 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther King's 1963 Civil Rights March.  It is a time to count our blessings, pray for what we can accomplish together in the coming years, and be proud of what we Republicans accomplished all those years ago.