Zimmerman prosecutor Angela Corey may face a reckoning

Thomas Lifson
Angela Corey, the special prosecutor who struck out going after George Zimmerman, has not taken defeat well.  At Red State, streiff catalogues her outrageous behavior in an article that should be read in its entirety:

I think everyone can now agree on one thing, Angela Corey was possibly the worst possible choice for a high profile prosecution.

She has a sense of entitlement that is so typical of small people promoted to jobs that are well above their level of competency but who lack the self-awareness to recognize what everyone else knows. (You need look no further than her bizarre post-verdict press conference that she treated as though it was an Academy Awards acceptance rather than a repudiation to see that she occupies a different reality than most.) In Angela Corey's world, criticism of her is a basis for legal action. She has threatened to sue Harvard if it did not fire Alan freakin Dershowitz after he pointed out her lack of legal acumen and ethics. In Florida she is something of a legend for threatening her critics.

Her lack of concern for the rule of law was almost immediately apparent. Shortly after she received the case she gave a press conference in which she disclosed that she was not seeking justice, but "justice for Trayvon":

Corey:  The first thing my team and I did upon being appointed was to meet with Trayvon's family and pray with them.  "We opened our meeting with prayer."  Also, Ms. Corey thanked "all those people across this country who have sent positive energy and prayers our way," and she asked them to continue to pray for Trayvon's family and for her team.  "Remember, it is Trayvon's family that are our constitutional victims...."

In short, the press conference seemed calculated to declare Zimmerman guilty before an investigation was completed or a trial conducted, conduct, which the article notes, runs counter to Florida law and American Bar Association professional standards.

In the ongoing national Get Zimmie psychodrama launched by the left, Corey is auditioning for the role of villain.And she may face a reckoning in court. Chris Francescani of Reuters writes:

A former employee of Florida State Attorney Angela Corey's office plans to file a whistleblower lawsuit against George Zimmerman's prosecutors, his attorney told Reuters on Tuesday. (snip)

Ben Kruidbos, Corey's former director of information technology, was fired after testifying at a pre-trial hearing on June 6 that prosecutors failed to turn over potentially embarrassing evidence extracted from Martin's cell phone to the defense, as required by evidence-sharing laws.

"We will be filing a whistleblower action in (Florida's Fourth Judicial District) Circuit Court," said Kruidbos' attorney Wesley White, himself a former prosecutor who was hired by Corey but resigned in December because he disagreed with her prosecutorial priorities. He said the suit will be filed within the next 30 days.

If blacks start flocking to defend Corey, they will be defending a prosecutor that made a practice of charging young black criminals as adults.  Streiff notes:

In 2011, she prosecuted a 12 year old boy, Cristian Fernandez, as an adult with every intention of sending him away for life. In a move eerily similar to Corey having George Zimmerman's wife, Shellie, indicted for perjury, Corey has also prosecuted Fernandez's mother. This case got the attention of those defenders of the Philadelphia polling places, the New Black Panther Party.

The next year, Corey's office charged a 31-year old black woman, Marissa Alexander, with attempted murder when she fired a weapon, during an altercation with her ex-husband who was under a restraining order. Alexander is serving a 20-year sentence. The Florida NAACP was not amused.

Beyond these cases, there is the fact that Corey's office leads the state in prosecuting black juveniles as adults.

In fact she prosecutes black juveniles as adults 20% above the statewide average.

Ian Tuttle at NRO describes some other issues Corey is handing her critics:

Corey knows about personal vendettas. They seem to be her specialty. When Ron Littlepage, a journalist for the Florida Times-Union, wrote a column criticizing her handling of the Christian Fernandez case - in which Corey chose to prosecute a twelve-year-old boy for first-degree murder, who wound up locked in solitary confinement in an adult jail prior to his court date - she "fired off a two-page, single-spaced letter on official state-attorney letterhead hinting at lawsuits for libel."

And that was moderate. When Corey was appointed to handle the Zimmerman case, Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte, a former president of both the American Bar Association and Florida State University, criticized the decision: "I cannot imagine a worse choice for a prosecutor to serve in the Sanford case. There is nothing in Angela Corey's background that suits her for the task, and she cannot command the respect of people who care about justice." Corey responded by making a public-records request of the university for all e-mails, text messages, and phone messages in which D'Alemberte had mentioned Fernandez. Like Littlepage, D'Alemberte had earlier criticized Corey's handling of the Fernandez case. (snip)

Shortly after Dershowitz's criticisms, Harvard Law School's dean's office received a phone call. When the dean refused to pick up, Angela Corey spent a half hour demanding of an office-of-communications employee that Dershowitz be fired. According to Dershowitz, Corey threatened to sue Harvard, to try to get him disbarred, and also to sue him for slander and libel. Corey also told the communications employee that she had assigned a state investigator - an employee of the State of Florida, that is - to investigate Dershowitz. "That's an abuse of office right there," Dershowitz says.

So the campaign against Dershowitz is part of a pattern of going after critics. But consider for a moment how delusional it was to waste her time telephoning Harvard Law School in an effort to get a famous tenured professor fired for criticizing her. She lives in a fantasy world where professors at Harvard can't get away with crticizing her.  If she is put under a microscope, Angela Corey is going to be her own undoing. Megalomania never works out well in the end.

Angela Corey, the special prosecutor who struck out going after George Zimmerman, has not taken defeat well.  At Red State, streiff catalogues her outrageous behavior in an article that should be read in its entirety:

I think everyone can now agree on one thing, Angela Corey was possibly the worst possible choice for a high profile prosecution.

She has a sense of entitlement that is so typical of small people promoted to jobs that are well above their level of competency but who lack the self-awareness to recognize what everyone else knows. (You need look no further than her bizarre post-verdict press conference that she treated as though it was an Academy Awards acceptance rather than a repudiation to see that she occupies a different reality than most.) In Angela Corey's world, criticism of her is a basis for legal action. She has threatened to sue Harvard if it did not fire Alan freakin Dershowitz after he pointed out her lack of legal acumen and ethics. In Florida she is something of a legend for threatening her critics.

Her lack of concern for the rule of law was almost immediately apparent. Shortly after she received the case she gave a press conference in which she disclosed that she was not seeking justice, but "justice for Trayvon":

Corey:  The first thing my team and I did upon being appointed was to meet with Trayvon's family and pray with them.  "We opened our meeting with prayer."  Also, Ms. Corey thanked "all those people across this country who have sent positive energy and prayers our way," and she asked them to continue to pray for Trayvon's family and for her team.  "Remember, it is Trayvon's family that are our constitutional victims...."

In short, the press conference seemed calculated to declare Zimmerman guilty before an investigation was completed or a trial conducted, conduct, which the article notes, runs counter to Florida law and American Bar Association professional standards.

In the ongoing national Get Zimmie psychodrama launched by the left, Corey is auditioning for the role of villain.And she may face a reckoning in court. Chris Francescani of Reuters writes:

A former employee of Florida State Attorney Angela Corey's office plans to file a whistleblower lawsuit against George Zimmerman's prosecutors, his attorney told Reuters on Tuesday. (snip)

Ben Kruidbos, Corey's former director of information technology, was fired after testifying at a pre-trial hearing on June 6 that prosecutors failed to turn over potentially embarrassing evidence extracted from Martin's cell phone to the defense, as required by evidence-sharing laws.

"We will be filing a whistleblower action in (Florida's Fourth Judicial District) Circuit Court," said Kruidbos' attorney Wesley White, himself a former prosecutor who was hired by Corey but resigned in December because he disagreed with her prosecutorial priorities. He said the suit will be filed within the next 30 days.

If blacks start flocking to defend Corey, they will be defending a prosecutor that made a practice of charging young black criminals as adults.  Streiff notes:

In 2011, she prosecuted a 12 year old boy, Cristian Fernandez, as an adult with every intention of sending him away for life. In a move eerily similar to Corey having George Zimmerman's wife, Shellie, indicted for perjury, Corey has also prosecuted Fernandez's mother. This case got the attention of those defenders of the Philadelphia polling places, the New Black Panther Party.

The next year, Corey's office charged a 31-year old black woman, Marissa Alexander, with attempted murder when she fired a weapon, during an altercation with her ex-husband who was under a restraining order. Alexander is serving a 20-year sentence. The Florida NAACP was not amused.

Beyond these cases, there is the fact that Corey's office leads the state in prosecuting black juveniles as adults.

In fact she prosecutes black juveniles as adults 20% above the statewide average.

Ian Tuttle at NRO describes some other issues Corey is handing her critics:

Corey knows about personal vendettas. They seem to be her specialty. When Ron Littlepage, a journalist for the Florida Times-Union, wrote a column criticizing her handling of the Christian Fernandez case - in which Corey chose to prosecute a twelve-year-old boy for first-degree murder, who wound up locked in solitary confinement in an adult jail prior to his court date - she "fired off a two-page, single-spaced letter on official state-attorney letterhead hinting at lawsuits for libel."

And that was moderate. When Corey was appointed to handle the Zimmerman case, Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte, a former president of both the American Bar Association and Florida State University, criticized the decision: "I cannot imagine a worse choice for a prosecutor to serve in the Sanford case. There is nothing in Angela Corey's background that suits her for the task, and she cannot command the respect of people who care about justice." Corey responded by making a public-records request of the university for all e-mails, text messages, and phone messages in which D'Alemberte had mentioned Fernandez. Like Littlepage, D'Alemberte had earlier criticized Corey's handling of the Fernandez case. (snip)

Shortly after Dershowitz's criticisms, Harvard Law School's dean's office received a phone call. When the dean refused to pick up, Angela Corey spent a half hour demanding of an office-of-communications employee that Dershowitz be fired. According to Dershowitz, Corey threatened to sue Harvard, to try to get him disbarred, and also to sue him for slander and libel. Corey also told the communications employee that she had assigned a state investigator - an employee of the State of Florida, that is - to investigate Dershowitz. "That's an abuse of office right there," Dershowitz says.

So the campaign against Dershowitz is part of a pattern of going after critics. But consider for a moment how delusional it was to waste her time telephoning Harvard Law School in an effort to get a famous tenured professor fired for criticizing her. She lives in a fantasy world where professors at Harvard can't get away with crticizing her.  If she is put under a microscope, Angela Corey is going to be her own undoing. Megalomania never works out well in the end.