Trayvon Martin, where's your daddy?

Listening to talk radio gives you a different perspective on things.  I particularly enjoy listening to callers air their gripes and approvals.  One of my favorite shows is Chris Krok in Dallas-Ft. Worth.  Chris is
soft-spoken, a Christian, and a devout family man.

This past week has been one of constant complaining from callers over the George Zimmerman verdict of "not guilty."  There is a large black population in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, and Chris took many such calls.

Last Friday, President Obama made the comment again: "If I had a son..."  We all know the story.  Only this time Obama in reference to the Zimmerman verdict went further: "It could have been me."  This is not very tasteful, especially from a sitting president.

Chris took exception to what the president said; as he put it, "if Trayvon Martin had had a daddy in the family, he might not be dead today."  The implication was that Trayvon had had no father figure to teach him right and wrong.  In effect, Trayvon was raising himself on the streets.  Moreover, Chris claimed, "72% of households have no father figure present."

An older black woman got on the phone and proceeded to challenge Chris on his statements.  "No, no, no!  The problem isn't Trayvon's father.  The problem is the subsidies black women get from the government.  The subsidies give a mother more money than these unemployed black men can give.  You know these subsidies have been around for many, many years.  That's the cause for us black folks having no fathers."

I think Chris almost fell out of his chair; I know I did!  Chris wanted to ask this woman a few questions, but it wasn't going to happen.  She realized what she had just said and didn't want to be put on the spot.  She hung up!

Lets be clear here.  "Subsidies" are a nice way of saying welfare.  So my question would have been simple: "If subsidies are a major problem with black families, what would you do to fix it?"

It is amazing to me that this black woman was willing to admit to the American public that the root cause of broken black families is government "subsidies."

But before you confine the argument to strictly black families, know this: the Hispanic rate of unwed or abandoned mothers is 31%.  White mothers is 22%.  These percentages are old (2004).

Maybe President Obama could address this issue the next time he speaks to the American press.

Listening to talk radio gives you a different perspective on things.  I particularly enjoy listening to callers air their gripes and approvals.  One of my favorite shows is Chris Krok in Dallas-Ft. Worth.  Chris is
soft-spoken, a Christian, and a devout family man.

This past week has been one of constant complaining from callers over the George Zimmerman verdict of "not guilty."  There is a large black population in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, and Chris took many such calls.

Last Friday, President Obama made the comment again: "If I had a son..."  We all know the story.  Only this time Obama in reference to the Zimmerman verdict went further: "It could have been me."  This is not very tasteful, especially from a sitting president.

Chris took exception to what the president said; as he put it, "if Trayvon Martin had had a daddy in the family, he might not be dead today."  The implication was that Trayvon had had no father figure to teach him right and wrong.  In effect, Trayvon was raising himself on the streets.  Moreover, Chris claimed, "72% of households have no father figure present."

An older black woman got on the phone and proceeded to challenge Chris on his statements.  "No, no, no!  The problem isn't Trayvon's father.  The problem is the subsidies black women get from the government.  The subsidies give a mother more money than these unemployed black men can give.  You know these subsidies have been around for many, many years.  That's the cause for us black folks having no fathers."

I think Chris almost fell out of his chair; I know I did!  Chris wanted to ask this woman a few questions, but it wasn't going to happen.  She realized what she had just said and didn't want to be put on the spot.  She hung up!

Lets be clear here.  "Subsidies" are a nice way of saying welfare.  So my question would have been simple: "If subsidies are a major problem with black families, what would you do to fix it?"

It is amazing to me that this black woman was willing to admit to the American public that the root cause of broken black families is government "subsidies."

But before you confine the argument to strictly black families, know this: the Hispanic rate of unwed or abandoned mothers is 31%.  White mothers is 22%.  These percentages are old (2004).

Maybe President Obama could address this issue the next time he speaks to the American press.

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