Mexican police chief killed with Fast and Furious rifle

Rick Moran
The Fast and Furious scandal has claimed another victim. This time, it's a police chief in Mexico that was gunned down with one of the rifles that was walked across the border and eventually ended up in the hands of one of the drug cartels.

A high-powered rifle lost in the ATF's Fast and Furious controversy was used to kill a Mexican police chief in the state of Jalisco earlier this year, according to internal Department of Justice records, suggesting that weapons from the failed gun-tracking operation have now made it into the hands of violent drug cartels deep inside Mexico.

Luis Lucio Rosales Astorga, the police chief in the city of Hostotipaquillo, was shot to death Jan. 29 when gunmen intercepted his patrol car and opened fire. Also killed was one of his bodyguards. His wife and a second bodyguard were wounded.

Local authorities said eight suspects in their 20s and 30s were arrested after police seized them nearby with a cache of weapons -- rifles, grenades, handguns, helmets, bulletproof vests, uniforms and special communications equipment. The area is a hot zone for rival drug gangs, with members of three cartels fighting over turf in the region.

A semi-automatic WASR rifle, the firearm that killed the chief, was traced back to the Lone Wolf Trading Company, a gun store in Glendale, Ariz. The notation on the Department of Justice trace records said the WASR was used in a "HOMICIDE - WILLFUL - KILL -PUB OFF -GUN" -ATF code for "Homicide, Willful Killing of a Public Official, Gun."

Hundreds of firearms were lost in the Fast and Furious operation. The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives allowed illegal purchasers to buy the firearms at the Lone Wolf store in the Phoenix suburb and other gun shops in hopes of tracing them to Mexican cartel leaders.

The WASR used in Jalisco was purchased on Feb. 22, 2010, about three months into the Fast and Furious operation, by 26-year-old Jacob A. Montelongo of Phoenix. He later pleaded guilty to conspiracy, making false statements and smuggling goods from the United States and was sentenced to 41 months in prison.

Court records show Montelongo personally obtained at least 109 firearms during Fast and Furious. How the WASR ended up in the state of Jalisco, which is deep in central Mexico and includes the country's second-largest metropolis, Guadalajara, remained unclear. 

And so the body count continues to grow while DoJ and ATF withhold documents, stonewall congress, and avoid responsibility for this massive screw up of an operation. They counted on the press losing interest in the story and they were right to do so. And those that do take a continuing interest in the scandal, like CBS's investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson, are investigated and intimidated.

Like the NSA, Benghazi, and IRS scandals, it doesn't appear that anyone is ever going to jail for Fast and Furious. But when the government takes actions that lead directly to murder, who should take responsibility for facilitating the crime?

Don't ask Eric Holder.

The Fast and Furious scandal has claimed another victim. This time, it's a police chief in Mexico that was gunned down with one of the rifles that was walked across the border and eventually ended up in the hands of one of the drug cartels.

A high-powered rifle lost in the ATF's Fast and Furious controversy was used to kill a Mexican police chief in the state of Jalisco earlier this year, according to internal Department of Justice records, suggesting that weapons from the failed gun-tracking operation have now made it into the hands of violent drug cartels deep inside Mexico.

Luis Lucio Rosales Astorga, the police chief in the city of Hostotipaquillo, was shot to death Jan. 29 when gunmen intercepted his patrol car and opened fire. Also killed was one of his bodyguards. His wife and a second bodyguard were wounded.

Local authorities said eight suspects in their 20s and 30s were arrested after police seized them nearby with a cache of weapons -- rifles, grenades, handguns, helmets, bulletproof vests, uniforms and special communications equipment. The area is a hot zone for rival drug gangs, with members of three cartels fighting over turf in the region.

A semi-automatic WASR rifle, the firearm that killed the chief, was traced back to the Lone Wolf Trading Company, a gun store in Glendale, Ariz. The notation on the Department of Justice trace records said the WASR was used in a "HOMICIDE - WILLFUL - KILL -PUB OFF -GUN" -ATF code for "Homicide, Willful Killing of a Public Official, Gun."

Hundreds of firearms were lost in the Fast and Furious operation. The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives allowed illegal purchasers to buy the firearms at the Lone Wolf store in the Phoenix suburb and other gun shops in hopes of tracing them to Mexican cartel leaders.

The WASR used in Jalisco was purchased on Feb. 22, 2010, about three months into the Fast and Furious operation, by 26-year-old Jacob A. Montelongo of Phoenix. He later pleaded guilty to conspiracy, making false statements and smuggling goods from the United States and was sentenced to 41 months in prison.

Court records show Montelongo personally obtained at least 109 firearms during Fast and Furious. How the WASR ended up in the state of Jalisco, which is deep in central Mexico and includes the country's second-largest metropolis, Guadalajara, remained unclear. 

And so the body count continues to grow while DoJ and ATF withhold documents, stonewall congress, and avoid responsibility for this massive screw up of an operation. They counted on the press losing interest in the story and they were right to do so. And those that do take a continuing interest in the scandal, like CBS's investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson, are investigated and intimidated.

Like the NSA, Benghazi, and IRS scandals, it doesn't appear that anyone is ever going to jail for Fast and Furious. But when the government takes actions that lead directly to murder, who should take responsibility for facilitating the crime?

Don't ask Eric Holder.