Justice for Trayvon - Sharpton Style

Keith Edwards
America has come a long way since the days of mob rule in the old south. There was no need for a trial if the court of public opinion had spoken. As long as there was an accusation that a black person had done something or somebody wrong, and there were enough enraged whites on board, justice usually awaited the accused either at the brutal hands of the local Sheriff's department, a fixed trial, or at the end of a rope. In either case, the mob always made sure justice was served - their way.

People would agree that those times in the south were horrific, inhumane, and a total abomination of what our criminal justice system was designed to do. It seemed that innocent until proven guilty was for whites only.

So where does that leave us today after the George Zimmerman trial and his subsequent acquittal?

There hasn't been a trial this scrutinized since the O.J trial. With wall-to-wall coverage, day after day, including weekends, and plenty of analysis to boot. And you literally couldn't turn on a media station during the trial without seeing and hearing reports and analysis of the Zimmerman trial.

There were few complaints from on-lookers as the trial proceeded because the entire trial was laid open and bare for the whole world to see. But when the wheels of justice rolled in a verdict of innocent for Zimmerman, guess what happened? Many people who had just witnesses the judicial system work exactly as it was intended, suddenly began to protest that justice had not been served!

Predictably, as far as Al Sharpton and many the other so-called black activists are concerned, this verdict was not justice. Interestingly, they can't really articulate what it was, but they know beyond a reasonable doubt that it wasn't justice - as far as they are concerned. And they plan on doing something about it.

So the question to Al Sharpton, and anyone who agrees with him is; would they have rather taken matters into their own hands and exacted whatever justice they thought was due George Zimmerman before the police showed up? Do they believe there should have been a little attitude adjustment on George Zimmerman during questioning at the hands of the local police to help him remember and confess to what really happened that night? Maybe George Zimmerman could have had an unfortunate accident either on his way to jail or in his jail cell. Or if it went as far as a trial, how about stacking the jury with all black women who have all lost a son to gun violence?    

Sound familiar?

Unfortunately, there have been some in the protest crowds who have articulated that they believe some of these things (and worse) should have happened to Zimmerman to help exact justice - their way.

But isn't this the kind of vigilantly justice Al Sharpton and other black civil-rights leaders who agree with him marched against and fought to eradicate in the old south?

And isn't what just took place in the Zimmerman trial exactly what they fought for as "equal" justice in its place?

Sorry Al, you can't have it both ways.


America has come a long way since the days of mob rule in the old south. There was no need for a trial if the court of public opinion had spoken. As long as there was an accusation that a black person had done something or somebody wrong, and there were enough enraged whites on board, justice usually awaited the accused either at the brutal hands of the local Sheriff's department, a fixed trial, or at the end of a rope. In either case, the mob always made sure justice was served - their way.

People would agree that those times in the south were horrific, inhumane, and a total abomination of what our criminal justice system was designed to do. It seemed that innocent until proven guilty was for whites only.

So where does that leave us today after the George Zimmerman trial and his subsequent acquittal?

There hasn't been a trial this scrutinized since the O.J trial. With wall-to-wall coverage, day after day, including weekends, and plenty of analysis to boot. And you literally couldn't turn on a media station during the trial without seeing and hearing reports and analysis of the Zimmerman trial.

There were few complaints from on-lookers as the trial proceeded because the entire trial was laid open and bare for the whole world to see. But when the wheels of justice rolled in a verdict of innocent for Zimmerman, guess what happened? Many people who had just witnesses the judicial system work exactly as it was intended, suddenly began to protest that justice had not been served!

Predictably, as far as Al Sharpton and many the other so-called black activists are concerned, this verdict was not justice. Interestingly, they can't really articulate what it was, but they know beyond a reasonable doubt that it wasn't justice - as far as they are concerned. And they plan on doing something about it.

So the question to Al Sharpton, and anyone who agrees with him is; would they have rather taken matters into their own hands and exacted whatever justice they thought was due George Zimmerman before the police showed up? Do they believe there should have been a little attitude adjustment on George Zimmerman during questioning at the hands of the local police to help him remember and confess to what really happened that night? Maybe George Zimmerman could have had an unfortunate accident either on his way to jail or in his jail cell. Or if it went as far as a trial, how about stacking the jury with all black women who have all lost a son to gun violence?    

Sound familiar?

Unfortunately, there have been some in the protest crowds who have articulated that they believe some of these things (and worse) should have happened to Zimmerman to help exact justice - their way.

But isn't this the kind of vigilantly justice Al Sharpton and other black civil-rights leaders who agree with him marched against and fought to eradicate in the old south?

And isn't what just took place in the Zimmerman trial exactly what they fought for as "equal" justice in its place?

Sorry Al, you can't have it both ways.