If a person 'cannot stand his ground, what can he do?

Bruce Johnson

Per the Florida Statute, Use of force in defense of person. 776.012

"A person is justified in using force, except deadly force, against another when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes that such conduct is necessary to defend himself or herself or another against the other's imminent use of unlawful force. However, a person is justified in the use of deadly force and does not have a duty to retreat if:

He or she reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent (1) death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the imminent commission of a forcible felony; .."

If you have no opportunity to retreat, you can stand your ground.  If that is "bad law," please provide, Mr. Holder, the "good law."  Are we to pull out a rule book if we are pinned to the ground, or may we defend ourselves against
someone who is in the process of rearranging your brain cells against the concrete?

If a Black Panther comes at you with a billy club at a polling place, and you defend yourself, in the Holder world,  have you done something wrong?  Probably.

The victims seem to lose their status, their predicaments seem to be forgotten and untold.  Jorge Zimmerman was having his melon knocked against the pavement and his nose broken.  Why are these facts omitted in the racially charged narratives?

Obama, biting his lower lip, tells the story. "Locks drop" when they see a black man.  Black men are followed around in the store.  Obama has part two down. What of "part one"?  Why do these things happen?

Years ago, Alan Keyes, the one time Presidential candidate took an interesting and unpopular stand on this topic.  A noted movie actor was complaining that he could not flag a cab down in Boston because he was black.  He was outraged at the cab drivers.  Mr. Keyes suggested that the movie actor's anger was misplaced. Alan suggested that the outrage should be directed at those who came before the actor and did rob the cab drivers and thus shaped the stereotype.  Perhaps this is too complicated for Obama or Holder to understand.  There is a reason why people behave the way they do. "Dropped locks" is learned behavior.

If 50 youths all of a sudden show up a store on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, is the store owner supposed to welcome the business?  Expect a good day in sales?  Or is his store about to be cleaned out?  History says the later.

The national average police response time is 11 minutes.  In Detroit it is over 58 minutes. This underscores the reality of police work.  They do not "serve and protect", they "serve and respond". 

Asked why one would want to have a concealed carry permit, a man responded..."Because a policeman is too heavy to carry around."

Dropped locks aren't enough.  Bullet proof glass is more in order. 

 

Bruce Johnson

 

 

Per the Florida Statute, Use of force in defense of person. 776.012

"A person is justified in using force, except deadly force, against another when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes that such conduct is necessary to defend himself or herself or another against the other's imminent use of unlawful force. However, a person is justified in the use of deadly force and does not have a duty to retreat if:

He or she reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent (1) death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the imminent commission of a forcible felony; .."

If you have no opportunity to retreat, you can stand your ground.  If that is "bad law," please provide, Mr. Holder, the "good law."  Are we to pull out a rule book if we are pinned to the ground, or may we defend ourselves against
someone who is in the process of rearranging your brain cells against the concrete?

If a Black Panther comes at you with a billy club at a polling place, and you defend yourself, in the Holder world,  have you done something wrong?  Probably.

The victims seem to lose their status, their predicaments seem to be forgotten and untold.  Jorge Zimmerman was having his melon knocked against the pavement and his nose broken.  Why are these facts omitted in the racially charged narratives?

Obama, biting his lower lip, tells the story. "Locks drop" when they see a black man.  Black men are followed around in the store.  Obama has part two down. What of "part one"?  Why do these things happen?

Years ago, Alan Keyes, the one time Presidential candidate took an interesting and unpopular stand on this topic.  A noted movie actor was complaining that he could not flag a cab down in Boston because he was black.  He was outraged at the cab drivers.  Mr. Keyes suggested that the movie actor's anger was misplaced. Alan suggested that the outrage should be directed at those who came before the actor and did rob the cab drivers and thus shaped the stereotype.  Perhaps this is too complicated for Obama or Holder to understand.  There is a reason why people behave the way they do. "Dropped locks" is learned behavior.

If 50 youths all of a sudden show up a store on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, is the store owner supposed to welcome the business?  Expect a good day in sales?  Or is his store about to be cleaned out?  History says the later.

The national average police response time is 11 minutes.  In Detroit it is over 58 minutes. This underscores the reality of police work.  They do not "serve and protect", they "serve and respond". 

Asked why one would want to have a concealed carry permit, a man responded..."Because a policeman is too heavy to carry around."

Dropped locks aren't enough.  Bullet proof glass is more in order. 

 

Bruce Johnson