Fatah calls for overthrow of Hamas in Gaza

Thomas Lifson
Hamas, the terror outfit that governs Gaza with backing from the Muslim Brotherhood, is under attack by its rival for governance of the Palestinians, Al Fatah, which governs the West Bank.  Khaled Abu Toameh of the Jerusalem Post reports:

Palestinian Authority leaders on Thursday expressed joy over the downfall of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi's regime, with some calling on Palestinians in the Gaza Strip to follow suit and topple the Hamas government.

Palestinian analysts predicted that the collapse of the Muslim Brotherhood regime in Egypt would undermine Hamas, which in the past year has been emboldened by Morsi's rise to power.

PA President Mahmoud Abbas was one of the first Arab leaders to congratulate the Egyptians on the ouster of Morsi.

In a letter to acting President Adli Mansour, Abbas congratulated him on the appointment, expressing hope that he would fulfill the aspirations of the Egyptian people to "live in freedom, dignity and stability."

As with Saudi Arabia and the Muslim Brotherhood and the civil war in Syria, the rivalry between Hamas and Fatah is a situation where it is a pity both sides can't lose right away. But between the two, Fatah is currently the more reasonable. Probably, nothing will come of this call, but it is good to have the sides more explicitly at odds.

In the longer run, if Islamism recedes in the Muslim world, both groups might in fact lose out. But for the foreseeable future, the best we can hope for (and currently are getting in Egypt) is for the MB to be on its heels.

 

Hamas, the terror outfit that governs Gaza with backing from the Muslim Brotherhood, is under attack by its rival for governance of the Palestinians, Al Fatah, which governs the West Bank.  Khaled Abu Toameh of the Jerusalem Post reports:

Palestinian Authority leaders on Thursday expressed joy over the downfall of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi's regime, with some calling on Palestinians in the Gaza Strip to follow suit and topple the Hamas government.

Palestinian analysts predicted that the collapse of the Muslim Brotherhood regime in Egypt would undermine Hamas, which in the past year has been emboldened by Morsi's rise to power.

PA President Mahmoud Abbas was one of the first Arab leaders to congratulate the Egyptians on the ouster of Morsi.

In a letter to acting President Adli Mansour, Abbas congratulated him on the appointment, expressing hope that he would fulfill the aspirations of the Egyptian people to "live in freedom, dignity and stability."

As with Saudi Arabia and the Muslim Brotherhood and the civil war in Syria, the rivalry between Hamas and Fatah is a situation where it is a pity both sides can't lose right away. But between the two, Fatah is currently the more reasonable. Probably, nothing will come of this call, but it is good to have the sides more explicitly at odds.

In the longer run, if Islamism recedes in the Muslim world, both groups might in fact lose out. But for the foreseeable future, the best we can hope for (and currently are getting in Egypt) is for the MB to be on its heels.