Let the House pick up the pieces of the immigration reform bill

Silvio Canto, Jr.

According to news reports, Senantor Cornyn of Texas wants to introduce a bill that enhances border security. He wants a higher threshold before the "legalization" begins.

Senator Reid calls it a "poison pill."  In reality, Senator Cornyn's idea is the only path to 60 votes. No Cornyn, no chance to get 60.

The bill is in trouble for several reasons:

1) ObamaCare has killed big bills, i.e. this one is about 900 pages.  Also, no one seems to trust the federal government to do anything.  Fair or unfair, the public is skeptical that the federal government will enforce border security.

2) Seven Democrats are out.  This is crucial because a lot of GOP Senators will not walk up to the table unless Democrats are on board.  I can't blame the GOP Senators in light of the demagoguery from Democrats about immigration over the last couple of years.

3) The "Path to citizenship" is a big problem for many of us who came here legally and went through the naturalization process. It just does not seem fair for people like me or the thousands playing by the rules.

Last, but not least, I don't care if the Senate proposal fails.  Frankly, the House has a better idea -- an issue by issue approach.

The House will be voting on several "stand alone" proposals, from "border security" to "guest worker visas" to the young "dreamers".

The House's approach will make it easier to find bipartisanship.

For example, you can probably get 75% on a measure on border security.  My guess is that many Democrats will vote for a fence or tough employer verification.

It will be easier to get legalization for young dreamers without the burdens of other proposals.  There are about 800,000 dreamers and they should get a path to legalization if they can meet certain requirements, such as a high school degree, college diploma or interest to serve in the military.

It will be easier to resolve the fate of the 10-12 million if you can break them into groups, i.e. visa overstays, time in the US, work skills.etc.  In other words, not all of the undocumented are Mexican or Central Americans who walked over the border.

Don't worry if the Senate can't get 60 votes.  The reality is in the House.  The future of a sensible immigration bill is there.

 

According to news reports, Senantor Cornyn of Texas wants to introduce a bill that enhances border security. He wants a higher threshold before the "legalization" begins.

Senator Reid calls it a "poison pill."  In reality, Senator Cornyn's idea is the only path to 60 votes. No Cornyn, no chance to get 60.

The bill is in trouble for several reasons:

1) ObamaCare has killed big bills, i.e. this one is about 900 pages.  Also, no one seems to trust the federal government to do anything.  Fair or unfair, the public is skeptical that the federal government will enforce border security.

2) Seven Democrats are out.  This is crucial because a lot of GOP Senators will not walk up to the table unless Democrats are on board.  I can't blame the GOP Senators in light of the demagoguery from Democrats about immigration over the last couple of years.

3) The "Path to citizenship" is a big problem for many of us who came here legally and went through the naturalization process. It just does not seem fair for people like me or the thousands playing by the rules.

Last, but not least, I don't care if the Senate proposal fails.  Frankly, the House has a better idea -- an issue by issue approach.

The House will be voting on several "stand alone" proposals, from "border security" to "guest worker visas" to the young "dreamers".

The House's approach will make it easier to find bipartisanship.

For example, you can probably get 75% on a measure on border security.  My guess is that many Democrats will vote for a fence or tough employer verification.

It will be easier to get legalization for young dreamers without the burdens of other proposals.  There are about 800,000 dreamers and they should get a path to legalization if they can meet certain requirements, such as a high school degree, college diploma or interest to serve in the military.

It will be easier to resolve the fate of the 10-12 million if you can break them into groups, i.e. visa overstays, time in the US, work skills.etc.  In other words, not all of the undocumented are Mexican or Central Americans who walked over the border.

Don't worry if the Senate can't get 60 votes.  The reality is in the House.  The future of a sensible immigration bill is there.