The tragedy is that millions bought into 'hope and change'

Over the weekend, I saw an article by Heather Long complaining that Obama has turned out to be a lot like Bush:

"This isn't the president so many took to the streets to cheer on in 2008. And the blame for that can't be placed solely on partisan politics or the media's thirst for a good scandal."

Miss Long reminisces about the excitement of election night 2008.  She saw people in the streets celebrating the coming of Obama.  She recalls the anticipation of a new day, here, there and everywhere.

Well, I also remember election night 2008.  Unlike Miss Long, I was disappointed because McCain lost and could not believe the hysterical reaction of so many in Chicago that night.  I looked at the TV screen and could not find the white smoke coming from the cathedral.

Let me send a nice message to Miss Long and the millions who fell for the Obama magic. 

Sorry but it was never really magic at all, unless you still believe that Peter Pan was a little boy who never grew up or that 3 little bears live in some enchanted forest.  

He was nothing but another politician telling Miss Long and so many what they desperately wanted to hear.  What did they want to hear?  They wanted to hear that it was all Bush's fault.

Miss Long actually had a bad case of "Bush derangement syndrome".  She invested so much in the idea that Obama was the dawning of a new day.  It was adults buying into the garbage that you could fix all of the world's problems by replacing Bush with Obama.

It was rather silly and infantile but that's what 2008 was largely about!

It was grown ups like Miss Long who got caught up in the rhetoric of a man who had never run anything or accomplished much.    He was the most unqualified man seeking the presidency in 2008 and was elected because millions wanted to believe in fairy tales and voodoo spells.

Well, it's 2013 and too many people like Miss Long can not believe what they are watching.  GITMO is still open and we are still fighting wars.  There are still people willing to blow up Americans despite the Cairo speech or all of those nicely crafted admissions that America has made mistakes in the past. 

Miss Long's article takes me back to something I saved from October 2008.  It was "Obama and the crowds" by Professor Fouad Ajami of Johns Hopkins University.  He made these comments about the Obama candidacy when Miss Long and so many were drunk in "Obamamania":

1) "The political genius of the man is that he is a blank slate. The devotees can project onto him what they wish."

2) "In recent days, those vast Obama crowds, though, have recalled for me the politics of charisma that wrecked Arab and Muslim societies. A leader does not have to say much, or be much. The crowd is left to its most powerful possession -- its imagination."

3) "The morning after the election, the disappointment will begin to settle upon the Obama crowd. Defeat -- by now unthinkable to the devotees -- will bring heartbreak. Victory will steadily deliver the sobering verdict that our troubles won't be solved by a leader's magic."

Sorry Miss Long but there were too many of you who wanted to believe in the fairy tale!  I guess that too many will have to accept that the prince won't be knocking on your door to see if the shoe fits your foot.

Fairy tales are for little children.  Politics are for adults.  We got that confused when millions voted for Obama in 2008.

 

Over the weekend, I saw an article by Heather Long complaining that Obama has turned out to be a lot like Bush:

"This isn't the president so many took to the streets to cheer on in 2008. And the blame for that can't be placed solely on partisan politics or the media's thirst for a good scandal."

Miss Long reminisces about the excitement of election night 2008.  She saw people in the streets celebrating the coming of Obama.  She recalls the anticipation of a new day, here, there and everywhere.

Well, I also remember election night 2008.  Unlike Miss Long, I was disappointed because McCain lost and could not believe the hysterical reaction of so many in Chicago that night.  I looked at the TV screen and could not find the white smoke coming from the cathedral.

Let me send a nice message to Miss Long and the millions who fell for the Obama magic. 

Sorry but it was never really magic at all, unless you still believe that Peter Pan was a little boy who never grew up or that 3 little bears live in some enchanted forest.  

He was nothing but another politician telling Miss Long and so many what they desperately wanted to hear.  What did they want to hear?  They wanted to hear that it was all Bush's fault.

Miss Long actually had a bad case of "Bush derangement syndrome".  She invested so much in the idea that Obama was the dawning of a new day.  It was adults buying into the garbage that you could fix all of the world's problems by replacing Bush with Obama.

It was rather silly and infantile but that's what 2008 was largely about!

It was grown ups like Miss Long who got caught up in the rhetoric of a man who had never run anything or accomplished much.    He was the most unqualified man seeking the presidency in 2008 and was elected because millions wanted to believe in fairy tales and voodoo spells.

Well, it's 2013 and too many people like Miss Long can not believe what they are watching.  GITMO is still open and we are still fighting wars.  There are still people willing to blow up Americans despite the Cairo speech or all of those nicely crafted admissions that America has made mistakes in the past. 

Miss Long's article takes me back to something I saved from October 2008.  It was "Obama and the crowds" by Professor Fouad Ajami of Johns Hopkins University.  He made these comments about the Obama candidacy when Miss Long and so many were drunk in "Obamamania":

1) "The political genius of the man is that he is a blank slate. The devotees can project onto him what they wish."

2) "In recent days, those vast Obama crowds, though, have recalled for me the politics of charisma that wrecked Arab and Muslim societies. A leader does not have to say much, or be much. The crowd is left to its most powerful possession -- its imagination."

3) "The morning after the election, the disappointment will begin to settle upon the Obama crowd. Defeat -- by now unthinkable to the devotees -- will bring heartbreak. Victory will steadily deliver the sobering verdict that our troubles won't be solved by a leader's magic."

Sorry Miss Long but there were too many of you who wanted to believe in the fairy tale!  I guess that too many will have to accept that the prince won't be knocking on your door to see if the shoe fits your foot.

Fairy tales are for little children.  Politics are for adults.  We got that confused when millions voted for Obama in 2008.

 

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