Senate approves internet sales tax

Rick Moran
Because, you know, we don't pay enough taxes already.

CNN:

The Senate approved a long-anticipated Internet sales tax proposal on Monday, moving the legislation one step closer to enactment and paving the way for shoppers to pay sales tax on the majority of online purchases.

The so-called Marketplace Fairness Act would allow the 45 states (and the District of Columbia) that currently charge sales taxes to require large online retailers to collect tax on purchases made by their residents. The law would only apply to online sellers that have sales of at least $1 million in states where they don't have physical operations, like a store or a warehouse.

The Senate voted 69 to 27 to approve the bill, which enjoyed bipartisan support. But before it can become law, it must be approved by the House, where Republicans are split on the issue.

Some House Republicans have already expressed support for the bill, arguing that it would level the playing field for small brick-and-mortar retailers. They say it would not create a new tax, but rather enforce the collection of taxes already charged at traditional retailers. But other House Republicans still view that as a tax increase on consumers or say it would overburden Internet businesses in their states.

The Obama administration has endorsed the bill, so if it can gain approval in the House, it is likely to become law.

This was as inevitable as the sun coming up in the east every morning. Government is going to get its share of internet dollars, even if they have to ruin it for everyone. Everybody is looking for ways to cash in off the net so why should government be any different?

Frankly, I don't care if Joe's Hardware store down the block survives - any more than most people cared if mom and pop grocery stores survived, or the local blacksmith. "Creative destruction" is changing the way America shops. If we can't accept that, we may as well bring back buggy whip manufacturers.

By the way, this bill has nothing to do with "saving" small, brick and mortar retail businesses. This is about money for government. The small stores will still not be able to compete with large ones on price, despite the taxes that will be collected.

Nothing has changed except the bulging pockets of government bureaucrats.

Because, you know, we don't pay enough taxes already.

CNN:

The Senate approved a long-anticipated Internet sales tax proposal on Monday, moving the legislation one step closer to enactment and paving the way for shoppers to pay sales tax on the majority of online purchases.

The so-called Marketplace Fairness Act would allow the 45 states (and the District of Columbia) that currently charge sales taxes to require large online retailers to collect tax on purchases made by their residents. The law would only apply to online sellers that have sales of at least $1 million in states where they don't have physical operations, like a store or a warehouse.

The Senate voted 69 to 27 to approve the bill, which enjoyed bipartisan support. But before it can become law, it must be approved by the House, where Republicans are split on the issue.

Some House Republicans have already expressed support for the bill, arguing that it would level the playing field for small brick-and-mortar retailers. They say it would not create a new tax, but rather enforce the collection of taxes already charged at traditional retailers. But other House Republicans still view that as a tax increase on consumers or say it would overburden Internet businesses in their states.

The Obama administration has endorsed the bill, so if it can gain approval in the House, it is likely to become law.

This was as inevitable as the sun coming up in the east every morning. Government is going to get its share of internet dollars, even if they have to ruin it for everyone. Everybody is looking for ways to cash in off the net so why should government be any different?

Frankly, I don't care if Joe's Hardware store down the block survives - any more than most people cared if mom and pop grocery stores survived, or the local blacksmith. "Creative destruction" is changing the way America shops. If we can't accept that, we may as well bring back buggy whip manufacturers.

By the way, this bill has nothing to do with "saving" small, brick and mortar retail businesses. This is about money for government. The small stores will still not be able to compete with large ones on price, despite the taxes that will be collected.

Nothing has changed except the bulging pockets of government bureaucrats.