Reid calls Cruz a 'schoolyard bully'

Rick Moran
It's "Pick on Ted Cruz Week" in the Democratic party. First, former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson said that Cruz cannot be "defined" as Hispanic. Now Harry Reid calls his "friend" from Texas a "schoolyard bully."

The Hill:

Cruz said he was concerned that the conference report--which cannot be filibustered--would be used to raise the nation's debt ceiling. He asked that Reid amend his motion to go to conference to make out of order any provisions raising taxes or raising the debt ceiling.

Reid said Cruz had a chance to amend the Senate budget--which raises $975 billion in new tax revenue from tax reform--when it was considered on the floor.

He said Cruz's request to eliminate all taxes in a final House-Senate budget was absurd.

"The senator from Texas was on the losing side...now he wants us to adopt the losing side's view or we cannot go to conference," Reid said.

"My friend from Texas is like a schoolyard bully," Reid added.

"He pushes everybody around and is losing and instead of playing the game according to the rules, he not only takes the ball home with him, but he changes the rules that way no one wins except the bully who tries to indicate to people that he has won."

Cruz, a Tea Party darling whose rhetoric has sometimes raised eyebrows among Republicans, shot back that "I wasn't aware we are in the schoolyard."

Reid cut him off saying "enough."

You're not going to hear too many Republican senators come to Cruz's defense. The Texas senator has riled just about everyone in the senate, including many members of his own party. Does that matter?

It does if you want to accomplish anything in the senate. If Cruz just wants to stand up and scream at people because they're "wishy washy" that's his choice and he no doubt pleases many supporters when he does so.

But he shouldn't complain then, when any legislation he wants to pass is ignored by his colleagues. There are ancient rules that govern behavior in the senate. As a supposed conservative, Cruz should respect those rules and seek to accomplish what he wants to do for the people of Texas.

But the first term senator apparently isn't interested in accomplishing anything for his constituents. He seems very interested in running for president. Nothing wrong with that - good luck to him. Deep inside every senator ever elected is a president screaming to get out.

But presidential candidates need a record to run on. So far, Cruz doesn't have one - except getting a reputation for meanness and pettiness.



It's "Pick on Ted Cruz Week" in the Democratic party. First, former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson said that Cruz cannot be "defined" as Hispanic. Now Harry Reid calls his "friend" from Texas a "schoolyard bully."

The Hill:

Cruz said he was concerned that the conference report--which cannot be filibustered--would be used to raise the nation's debt ceiling. He asked that Reid amend his motion to go to conference to make out of order any provisions raising taxes or raising the debt ceiling.

Reid said Cruz had a chance to amend the Senate budget--which raises $975 billion in new tax revenue from tax reform--when it was considered on the floor.

He said Cruz's request to eliminate all taxes in a final House-Senate budget was absurd.

"The senator from Texas was on the losing side...now he wants us to adopt the losing side's view or we cannot go to conference," Reid said.

"My friend from Texas is like a schoolyard bully," Reid added.

"He pushes everybody around and is losing and instead of playing the game according to the rules, he not only takes the ball home with him, but he changes the rules that way no one wins except the bully who tries to indicate to people that he has won."

Cruz, a Tea Party darling whose rhetoric has sometimes raised eyebrows among Republicans, shot back that "I wasn't aware we are in the schoolyard."

Reid cut him off saying "enough."

You're not going to hear too many Republican senators come to Cruz's defense. The Texas senator has riled just about everyone in the senate, including many members of his own party. Does that matter?

It does if you want to accomplish anything in the senate. If Cruz just wants to stand up and scream at people because they're "wishy washy" that's his choice and he no doubt pleases many supporters when he does so.

But he shouldn't complain then, when any legislation he wants to pass is ignored by his colleagues. There are ancient rules that govern behavior in the senate. As a supposed conservative, Cruz should respect those rules and seek to accomplish what he wants to do for the people of Texas.

But the first term senator apparently isn't interested in accomplishing anything for his constituents. He seems very interested in running for president. Nothing wrong with that - good luck to him. Deep inside every senator ever elected is a president screaming to get out.

But presidential candidates need a record to run on. So far, Cruz doesn't have one - except getting a reputation for meanness and pettiness.