Miller refuses to identify 'rogue' IRS employees who targeted conservatives

This is just outrageous - like the rest of Stephen Miller's testimony yesterday.

Miller insists that singling out political groups for audits is not political. Wrap your brain around that logic, and then untangle it to try and understand his reasoning for not divulging the names of the "rogue" IRS employees responsible for coming up with the idea to target conservatives in the first place.

Reuters:

Republicans have vowed to find out who was involved, but Miller did not provide much of a road map.

"Who is responsible for targeting these individuals?" asked Representative Kevin Brady, a Texas Republican.

"I don't have names for you," Miller responded.

Republicans accused him of dodging their questions.

"I'm hearing, 'I don't know, I don't remember, I don't recall, I don't believe,'" said Representative Dave Reichert of Washington. "You don't even know who investigated the case, but yet you say it was investigated."

Democrats seemed more inclined to accept Miller's explanation.

"I am not convinced that this is a great big political conspiracy," Democratic Representative Danny Davis said.

Two other congressional committees will hold IRS hearings next week. One of them, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, plans to question five lower-level IRS employees over whether they played a role in the targeting of conservative groups.

Wolin and Douglas Shulman, who was IRS commissioner when the targeting occurred, also are scheduled to testify.

I hope they send this guy to prison for 20 years. Miller knew more than a year ago about the targeting but didn't tell Congress about it.

Miller's often-defiant appearance on Friday was unlikely to satisfy Republicans who have accused Obama's Democratic administration of using the machinery of government to target political foes.

They also have accused Miller of misleading Congress last year.

Miller acknowledged that he learned that IRS investigators were looking into the issue a year ago, but he did not mention the probe to lawmakers until the news became public last week. He said he had not misled lawmakers by keeping quiet about the issue in prior appearances on Capitol Hill.

"I was answering the questions that I was asked" by Congress, he told the House committee.

Miller appeared to grow irritated over the course of the four-hour hearing, repeatedly interrupting questioners, flashing quizzical looks and shrugging his shoulders.

In other words, you numb nut politicians didn't ask the right questions. He may not have lied, but he certainly tried to mislead Congress. And with the news that Obama's Treasury Department knew full well what was going on last year, the timeline of the president's foreknowledge of the targeting program slips back before the election - making keeping the information secret far more of a political decision than anything having to do with maintaining the integrity of the IG's investigation.




This is just outrageous - like the rest of Stephen Miller's testimony yesterday.

Miller insists that singling out political groups for audits is not political. Wrap your brain around that logic, and then untangle it to try and understand his reasoning for not divulging the names of the "rogue" IRS employees responsible for coming up with the idea to target conservatives in the first place.

Reuters:

Republicans have vowed to find out who was involved, but Miller did not provide much of a road map.

"Who is responsible for targeting these individuals?" asked Representative Kevin Brady, a Texas Republican.

"I don't have names for you," Miller responded.

Republicans accused him of dodging their questions.

"I'm hearing, 'I don't know, I don't remember, I don't recall, I don't believe,'" said Representative Dave Reichert of Washington. "You don't even know who investigated the case, but yet you say it was investigated."

Democrats seemed more inclined to accept Miller's explanation.

"I am not convinced that this is a great big political conspiracy," Democratic Representative Danny Davis said.

Two other congressional committees will hold IRS hearings next week. One of them, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, plans to question five lower-level IRS employees over whether they played a role in the targeting of conservative groups.

Wolin and Douglas Shulman, who was IRS commissioner when the targeting occurred, also are scheduled to testify.

I hope they send this guy to prison for 20 years. Miller knew more than a year ago about the targeting but didn't tell Congress about it.

Miller's often-defiant appearance on Friday was unlikely to satisfy Republicans who have accused Obama's Democratic administration of using the machinery of government to target political foes.

They also have accused Miller of misleading Congress last year.

Miller acknowledged that he learned that IRS investigators were looking into the issue a year ago, but he did not mention the probe to lawmakers until the news became public last week. He said he had not misled lawmakers by keeping quiet about the issue in prior appearances on Capitol Hill.

"I was answering the questions that I was asked" by Congress, he told the House committee.

Miller appeared to grow irritated over the course of the four-hour hearing, repeatedly interrupting questioners, flashing quizzical looks and shrugging his shoulders.

In other words, you numb nut politicians didn't ask the right questions. He may not have lied, but he certainly tried to mislead Congress. And with the news that Obama's Treasury Department knew full well what was going on last year, the timeline of the president's foreknowledge of the targeting program slips back before the election - making keeping the information secret far more of a political decision than anything having to do with maintaining the integrity of the IG's investigation.




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