Maybe they should sell it in the candy aisle

Rick Moran
It's 2013 in America. Do you know what your 15 year old daughter is doing?

If she had sex last night, it is now legal for her to purchase Plan B - the "morning after pill" - at your local drugstore. And you'll never be any the wiser.

Gee...what will our government think of next?

From the FDA press release:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it has approved an amended application submitted by Teva Women's Health, Inc. to market Plan B One-Step (active ingredient levonorgestrel) for use without a prescription by women 15 years of age and older.

They can't drive but the government considers a 15 year old teenager a "woman?"

After the FDA did not approve Teva's application to make Plan B One-Step available over-the-counter for all females of reproductive age in December 2011, the company submitted an amended application to make the product available for women 15 years of age and older without a prescription.

The product will now be labeled "not for sale to those under 15 years of age *proof of age required* not for sale where age cannot be verified." Plan B One-Step will be packaged with a product code prompting a cashier to request and verify the customer's age. A customer who cannot provide age verification will not be able to purchase the product. In addition, Teva has arranged to have a security tag placed on all product cartons to prevent theft.

And this "age verification" is going to stop 12, 13, and 14 year old girls from getting the stuff? Right.

In addition, Teva will make the product available in retail outlets with an onsite pharmacy, where it generally, will be available in the family planning or female health aisles. The product will be available for sale during the retailer's normal operating hours whether the pharmacy is open or not.

Plan B One-Step is an emergency contraceptive intended to reduce the possibility of pregnancy following unprotected sexual intercourse - if another form of birth control (e.g., condom) was not used or failed. Plan B One-Step is a single-dose pill (1.5 mg tablet) that is most effective in decreasing the possibility of unwanted pregnancy if taken immediately or within 3 days after unprotected sexual intercourse.

Plan B One-Step will not stop a pregnancy when a woman is already pregnant, and there is no medical evidence that the product will harm a developing fetus.

All of this evades the point; Plan B is a drug. It has side effects. And the principle that a parent should know what medications their children - and 15 years old is stil a child - are taking should override any trendy notion that 15 year old girls are "women" or that they are too embarrassed to talk about having sex with their parents and should not have to deal with the consequences of their choices.

Mind boggling.

It's 2013 in America. Do you know what your 15 year old daughter is doing?

If she had sex last night, it is now legal for her to purchase Plan B - the "morning after pill" - at your local drugstore. And you'll never be any the wiser.

Gee...what will our government think of next?

From the FDA press release:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it has approved an amended application submitted by Teva Women's Health, Inc. to market Plan B One-Step (active ingredient levonorgestrel) for use without a prescription by women 15 years of age and older.

They can't drive but the government considers a 15 year old teenager a "woman?"

After the FDA did not approve Teva's application to make Plan B One-Step available over-the-counter for all females of reproductive age in December 2011, the company submitted an amended application to make the product available for women 15 years of age and older without a prescription.

The product will now be labeled "not for sale to those under 15 years of age *proof of age required* not for sale where age cannot be verified." Plan B One-Step will be packaged with a product code prompting a cashier to request and verify the customer's age. A customer who cannot provide age verification will not be able to purchase the product. In addition, Teva has arranged to have a security tag placed on all product cartons to prevent theft.

And this "age verification" is going to stop 12, 13, and 14 year old girls from getting the stuff? Right.

In addition, Teva will make the product available in retail outlets with an onsite pharmacy, where it generally, will be available in the family planning or female health aisles. The product will be available for sale during the retailer's normal operating hours whether the pharmacy is open or not.

Plan B One-Step is an emergency contraceptive intended to reduce the possibility of pregnancy following unprotected sexual intercourse - if another form of birth control (e.g., condom) was not used or failed. Plan B One-Step is a single-dose pill (1.5 mg tablet) that is most effective in decreasing the possibility of unwanted pregnancy if taken immediately or within 3 days after unprotected sexual intercourse.

Plan B One-Step will not stop a pregnancy when a woman is already pregnant, and there is no medical evidence that the product will harm a developing fetus.

All of this evades the point; Plan B is a drug. It has side effects. And the principle that a parent should know what medications their children - and 15 years old is stil a child - are taking should override any trendy notion that 15 year old girls are "women" or that they are too embarrassed to talk about having sex with their parents and should not have to deal with the consequences of their choices.

Mind boggling.