Jon Stewart Is Criticizing Obama Too Late

David Lawrence
Sure of himself, holier than thou, without a dent in his smooth fabrications, Jon Stewart has come out of his firm gait to gallop onto the other side of the debate, to run with the Obama doubters.  It didn't bother him that Obama drove us more than sixteen trillion dollars into debt, that he didn't stop massive unemployment,  that he was the match that burned in cities throughout the Middle East, and that he was responsible for standing down when we should have been standing up in Benghazi.

No, while Obama was burning down Rome, Stewart just looked the other way and cracked his anti-conservative jokes like he was chewing on the jawbreakers of reason.  He now admits "that President Obama could have acted like Richard Nixon, but if he wasn't directly involved, it's still bad, because that makes him Mr. Magoo."

Well, if that's true, then that makes Jon Stewart Joey Tribbiani from Friends.  He is a buffoon who insists that Obama is right year in, year out -- that he is FDR reincarnated.  After four years of our president weakening our economy and our military, Stewart now decides that it's time to jump aboard on the Fox News anti-Obama bandwagon. 

But Fox News has earned its viewpoint by suffering the criticism of liberals for years in order to point out Obama's failures.  Stewart has taken no risks.  He has played up to his liberal audiences and earned nothing but popular applause by praising Obama.  He has not really earned the right to criticize Obama just to capture the audience when it is moving in the other direction.

Stewart thinks he can still play the political humor game despite his failures.  Stewart is now going after the Obama administration for its trifecta of scandals -- Benghazi, the IRS, and the DOJ and the Associated Press.  And once again he feels like a hero.  No matter which side he is on, he casts himself as the protagonist.  He uses information to create positive images of himself.  He is a narcissist who uses politics for self-aggrandizement.

Now the evidence that Obama is a failure is too great for even Stewart to ignore it.  Like a stand-up comic, he senses when the audience is turning against him.  He runs with the pack.  He sides with Fox like he is open-minded instead of incredibly dense to have backed an obvious naïve community organizer in the first place. 

Obama never belonged in office.  The joke was that he was a snide remark.  His incompetence was whispered of in the locker rooms.

Obama was a colossal mistake, and while the marching bands played in various stadiums, Jon Stewart was the baton twirler who led the band. 

Having misled us for four years, it's time for Jon Stewart to drop out of the game.  He said enough wrong to hamper his credibility.  He can save his humor for jokes about his wife or parties in the Catskills.

Sure of himself, holier than thou, without a dent in his smooth fabrications, Jon Stewart has come out of his firm gait to gallop onto the other side of the debate, to run with the Obama doubters.  It didn't bother him that Obama drove us more than sixteen trillion dollars into debt, that he didn't stop massive unemployment,  that he was the match that burned in cities throughout the Middle East, and that he was responsible for standing down when we should have been standing up in Benghazi.

No, while Obama was burning down Rome, Stewart just looked the other way and cracked his anti-conservative jokes like he was chewing on the jawbreakers of reason.  He now admits "that President Obama could have acted like Richard Nixon, but if he wasn't directly involved, it's still bad, because that makes him Mr. Magoo."

Well, if that's true, then that makes Jon Stewart Joey Tribbiani from Friends.  He is a buffoon who insists that Obama is right year in, year out -- that he is FDR reincarnated.  After four years of our president weakening our economy and our military, Stewart now decides that it's time to jump aboard on the Fox News anti-Obama bandwagon. 

But Fox News has earned its viewpoint by suffering the criticism of liberals for years in order to point out Obama's failures.  Stewart has taken no risks.  He has played up to his liberal audiences and earned nothing but popular applause by praising Obama.  He has not really earned the right to criticize Obama just to capture the audience when it is moving in the other direction.

Stewart thinks he can still play the political humor game despite his failures.  Stewart is now going after the Obama administration for its trifecta of scandals -- Benghazi, the IRS, and the DOJ and the Associated Press.  And once again he feels like a hero.  No matter which side he is on, he casts himself as the protagonist.  He uses information to create positive images of himself.  He is a narcissist who uses politics for self-aggrandizement.

Now the evidence that Obama is a failure is too great for even Stewart to ignore it.  Like a stand-up comic, he senses when the audience is turning against him.  He runs with the pack.  He sides with Fox like he is open-minded instead of incredibly dense to have backed an obvious naïve community organizer in the first place. 

Obama never belonged in office.  The joke was that he was a snide remark.  His incompetence was whispered of in the locker rooms.

Obama was a colossal mistake, and while the marching bands played in various stadiums, Jon Stewart was the baton twirler who led the band. 

Having misled us for four years, it's time for Jon Stewart to drop out of the game.  He said enough wrong to hamper his credibility.  He can save his humor for jokes about his wife or parties in the Catskills.