First they came for you...but I didn't care. Then they came for me. And you didn't care

Ethel C. Fenig

First the IRS came for the TEA Party and other conservatives.

And I said "Hooray!" because I wasn't conservative or a TEA Party supporterThe conservatives and TEA Party types are narrow-minded and intolerant; I believe in pluralism and diversity of thought and tolerance for all...those who agree with me. 

Then they came for the Jewish conservatives, who support Israel and I said "Hooray!" because I wasn't a Jewish conservative; sure, I grudgingly support Israel's right to exist...as long as they don't defend themselves too much.

Then they came for home schooling parents, and I said t "Hooray!" because I think all children belong in government run, taxpayer schools.

And then they came for me,and there was no one left to speak for me, because all those who truly believed in civil rights and liberty for all were silenced.

My little riff on Martin Niemöller's original statement about the dangers of ignoring government abusing others' rights as happened in Nazi Germany is of course mild satire because it couldn't happen here. Could it?  

And then I remember Joe the Plumber whose private life became embarrassingly public when an Ohio state government employee and avid Barack Obama (D) candidate supporter ordered background checks on Joe because he dared to question her idol.

But the increasingly serious allegations against the IRS are different, aren't they?  After all the agency is so disliked that taxpayers who owe money to the government are told to make out their checks, not to the IRS but the US Treasury. Or, as Politico headlined, "IRS under siege with no friends." 

And certainly the ever vigilant media would highlight the dangers of the IRS and the government gunning for, so to speak, those with whom it disagrees, harking back to the glory Watergate days when fearless reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward dug and dug and dug and persisted, with the encouragement of their equally fearless editor to discover "who knew what, when."  An IRSgate should be irresistible to the new generation of media people, shouldn't it?

Hmmm.  Maybe not.  After all, this is about the government targeting conservatives and well, the msm liberals--are there any other kind?--just don't seem to think that is so terrible. 

As Washington Examiner political correspondent Byron York tweeted, after initially being unable to find any mention of the IRS illegally harassing conservatives in the New York Times, 

  1. A reader notes this in NYT IRS story: 'A version of this article appeared in print on May 11, 2013, on page A11 of the New York edition.'
  1. My mistake. IRS story is way down, in tiny type, on NYT home page. My apologies.

DaTechGuy graphically illustrates the way down and tininess of the type; page A11 means this revelation about the IRS is buried deep within the paper;  less important than the doings of the latest television reality queen. Small-batch pulled pork gets larger print, a picture and a more prominent space in the NY Times index. 

Liberals have mixed emotions about the IRS misdoings judging by many of the comments in the randomly chosen liberal icons New York Times and The Daily Kos seem to indicate.

However, no hard feelings.  When the IRS comes for the New York Times or liberals--for purely political reasons of course--I will speak up against it because it is the right thing to do.  

If I can. 

 

 

First the IRS came for the TEA Party and other conservatives.

And I said "Hooray!" because I wasn't conservative or a TEA Party supporterThe conservatives and TEA Party types are narrow-minded and intolerant; I believe in pluralism and diversity of thought and tolerance for all...those who agree with me. 

Then they came for the Jewish conservatives, who support Israel and I said "Hooray!" because I wasn't a Jewish conservative; sure, I grudgingly support Israel's right to exist...as long as they don't defend themselves too much.

Then they came for home schooling parents, and I said t "Hooray!" because I think all children belong in government run, taxpayer schools.

And then they came for me,and there was no one left to speak for me, because all those who truly believed in civil rights and liberty for all were silenced.

My little riff on Martin Niemöller's original statement about the dangers of ignoring government abusing others' rights as happened in Nazi Germany is of course mild satire because it couldn't happen here. Could it?  

And then I remember Joe the Plumber whose private life became embarrassingly public when an Ohio state government employee and avid Barack Obama (D) candidate supporter ordered background checks on Joe because he dared to question her idol.

But the increasingly serious allegations against the IRS are different, aren't they?  After all the agency is so disliked that taxpayers who owe money to the government are told to make out their checks, not to the IRS but the US Treasury. Or, as Politico headlined, "IRS under siege with no friends." 

And certainly the ever vigilant media would highlight the dangers of the IRS and the government gunning for, so to speak, those with whom it disagrees, harking back to the glory Watergate days when fearless reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward dug and dug and dug and persisted, with the encouragement of their equally fearless editor to discover "who knew what, when."  An IRSgate should be irresistible to the new generation of media people, shouldn't it?

Hmmm.  Maybe not.  After all, this is about the government targeting conservatives and well, the msm liberals--are there any other kind?--just don't seem to think that is so terrible. 

As Washington Examiner political correspondent Byron York tweeted, after initially being unable to find any mention of the IRS illegally harassing conservatives in the New York Times, 

  1. A reader notes this in NYT IRS story: 'A version of this article appeared in print on May 11, 2013, on page A11 of the New York edition.'
  1. My mistake. IRS story is way down, in tiny type, on NYT home page. My apologies.

DaTechGuy graphically illustrates the way down and tininess of the type; page A11 means this revelation about the IRS is buried deep within the paper;  less important than the doings of the latest television reality queen. Small-batch pulled pork gets larger print, a picture and a more prominent space in the NY Times index. 

Liberals have mixed emotions about the IRS misdoings judging by many of the comments in the randomly chosen liberal icons New York Times and The Daily Kos seem to indicate.

However, no hard feelings.  When the IRS comes for the New York Times or liberals--for purely political reasons of course--I will speak up against it because it is the right thing to do.  

If I can.