A fraudster's dream: Colorado to allow mail-in voting

Rick Moran
Yes, but don't you know that if you oppose any of these measures to make it easier to stuff the ballot box, you're a dirty racist and loony conspiracist?

Denver Post:

The Colorado Senate passed a bill Thursday that would provide a ballot by mail to every state voter, allow vote centers for those who choose not to use the mail ballot and -- controversially -- allow people to register and vote on Election Day.

The bill passed 20-15 with the full support of Democrats and no Republican votes. The bill passed the House on a party-line vote last month.

Before it can go to Gov. John Hickenlooper for a signature to become the new way elections are held in Colorado, the bill must return to the House for approval because of "technical" amendments added in the Senate.

While legislators in both parties liked the convenience of more by-mail voting, Election Day registration was the grist for the oratory mill.

Sen. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud, said the bill, called the "Voter Access and Modernized Elections Act" by supporters, should instead be called the "Same Day Voter Fraud Act."

Though the bill's supporters say the bill doesn't change how people register to vote now, Republicans said cheaters could get a ballot with nothing more than a utility bill, which could be forged.

Rich Coolidge, spokesman for Secretary of State Scott Gessler, the state's top elections official, explained the concern.

"If I don't have a Colorado driver's license or don't know the last four digits of my (Social Security number), I can show up on Election Day with only a utility bill and get registered and vote a normal ballot," he wrote in an e-mail while the debate was unfolding.

"Yes, this is the vulnerability of our current system, but at least county officials have at least 29 days to review that data and the political parties and campaigns also have that information from the voter file. An election judge registering that voter same day is the only safeguard."

What could possibly go wrong?

For those who claim voter fraud is an infintesimal percentage of votes cast, these new regulations will open up the ballot to more people by making it convenient and easy to vote.

Who wouldn't want that? No one - as long as minimal safeguards are in place to prevent massive fraud - safeguards that are lacking here. To deny that organized efforts aren't made to commit voter fraud is to simply deny reality. And I'd go so far as to say that it happens on both sides. There is a history of vote buying, vote stealing, and ballot box stuffing in the United States. Why should we believe that because this is the 21st century it doesn't happen anymore?

The easier we make it to commit fraud, the more fraud will occur. That's the reality of politics whether in the 18th century or the 21st.



Yes, but don't you know that if you oppose any of these measures to make it easier to stuff the ballot box, you're a dirty racist and loony conspiracist?

Denver Post:

The Colorado Senate passed a bill Thursday that would provide a ballot by mail to every state voter, allow vote centers for those who choose not to use the mail ballot and -- controversially -- allow people to register and vote on Election Day.

The bill passed 20-15 with the full support of Democrats and no Republican votes. The bill passed the House on a party-line vote last month.

Before it can go to Gov. John Hickenlooper for a signature to become the new way elections are held in Colorado, the bill must return to the House for approval because of "technical" amendments added in the Senate.

While legislators in both parties liked the convenience of more by-mail voting, Election Day registration was the grist for the oratory mill.

Sen. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud, said the bill, called the "Voter Access and Modernized Elections Act" by supporters, should instead be called the "Same Day Voter Fraud Act."

Though the bill's supporters say the bill doesn't change how people register to vote now, Republicans said cheaters could get a ballot with nothing more than a utility bill, which could be forged.

Rich Coolidge, spokesman for Secretary of State Scott Gessler, the state's top elections official, explained the concern.

"If I don't have a Colorado driver's license or don't know the last four digits of my (Social Security number), I can show up on Election Day with only a utility bill and get registered and vote a normal ballot," he wrote in an e-mail while the debate was unfolding.

"Yes, this is the vulnerability of our current system, but at least county officials have at least 29 days to review that data and the political parties and campaigns also have that information from the voter file. An election judge registering that voter same day is the only safeguard."

What could possibly go wrong?

For those who claim voter fraud is an infintesimal percentage of votes cast, these new regulations will open up the ballot to more people by making it convenient and easy to vote.

Who wouldn't want that? No one - as long as minimal safeguards are in place to prevent massive fraud - safeguards that are lacking here. To deny that organized efforts aren't made to commit voter fraud is to simply deny reality. And I'd go so far as to say that it happens on both sides. There is a history of vote buying, vote stealing, and ballot box stuffing in the United States. Why should we believe that because this is the 21st century it doesn't happen anymore?

The easier we make it to commit fraud, the more fraud will occur. That's the reality of politics whether in the 18th century or the 21st.