29% of registered voters agree that 'armed revolution' might be necessary to protect liberty

Rick Moran
A poll conducted by Farleigh Dickenson University found that 29% of registered voters agreed with the statement, "In the next few years, an armed revolution might be necessary in order to protect our liberties."

CNS News:

Twenty-nine percent said they agreed, 47 percent said they disagreed, 18 percent said they neither agreed nor disagreed, 5 percent said they were unsure, and 1 percent refused to respond.

Results of the poll show that those who believe a revolution might be necessary differ greatly along party lines:

  • 18 percent of Democrats
  • 27 percent of Independents
  • 44 percent of Republicans

The poll found that 38 percent of Americans who believe a revolution might be necessary support additional gun control legislation compared to 62 percent of those who don't think an armed revolt will be needed.

Dan Cassino, a professor of political science at Fairleigh Dickinson and analyst for the poll, says:

"The differences in views of gun legislation are really a function of differences in what people believe guns are for.  If you truly believe an armed revolution is possible in the near future, you need weapons and you're going to be wary about government efforts to take them away."

First, it is important to note that the 29% who agree with the statement in no way support the idea of armed revolution. They simply agree with the poll question.

Second, the professor is on to something. There was a lot of unnecessary hysteria generated on the anti-gun control side, claiming the government was going to go after anyone with a gun - eventually or in the immediate future. While there may be legitimate slippery slope arguments about what was in the bill, such fears were unfounded given the the actual legislation and what was being proposed. But if you believed the NRA and others who claimed the government was coming for your guns, it would seem logical to assume that such a move would be resisted with armed might.

The left will make a big deal out of 44% of Republicans agreeing with the statement, but since the overwhelming majority of the party opposed the recent gun control bill, we should probably be surprised it wasn't higher.

The bottom line is that the chances for an armed revolution are extremely small because the chances of the government going gun grabbing are equally slim.


A poll conducted by Farleigh Dickenson University found that 29% of registered voters agreed with the statement, "In the next few years, an armed revolution might be necessary in order to protect our liberties."

CNS News:

Twenty-nine percent said they agreed, 47 percent said they disagreed, 18 percent said they neither agreed nor disagreed, 5 percent said they were unsure, and 1 percent refused to respond.

Results of the poll show that those who believe a revolution might be necessary differ greatly along party lines:

  • 18 percent of Democrats
  • 27 percent of Independents
  • 44 percent of Republicans

The poll found that 38 percent of Americans who believe a revolution might be necessary support additional gun control legislation compared to 62 percent of those who don't think an armed revolt will be needed.

Dan Cassino, a professor of political science at Fairleigh Dickinson and analyst for the poll, says:

"The differences in views of gun legislation are really a function of differences in what people believe guns are for.  If you truly believe an armed revolution is possible in the near future, you need weapons and you're going to be wary about government efforts to take them away."

First, it is important to note that the 29% who agree with the statement in no way support the idea of armed revolution. They simply agree with the poll question.

Second, the professor is on to something. There was a lot of unnecessary hysteria generated on the anti-gun control side, claiming the government was going to go after anyone with a gun - eventually or in the immediate future. While there may be legitimate slippery slope arguments about what was in the bill, such fears were unfounded given the the actual legislation and what was being proposed. But if you believed the NRA and others who claimed the government was coming for your guns, it would seem logical to assume that such a move would be resisted with armed might.

The left will make a big deal out of 44% of Republicans agreeing with the statement, but since the overwhelming majority of the party opposed the recent gun control bill, we should probably be surprised it wasn't higher.

The bottom line is that the chances for an armed revolution are extremely small because the chances of the government going gun grabbing are equally slim.