Boston Globe puts death of Annette Funicello above the fold, Thatcher below

Two stories appear above the fold on the front page of today's Boston Globe: one about "license plate-reading devices" and one on a transportation bill passing the House. A photo of Annette Funicello in her Mickey Mouse ears also appears above the fold in an "In the News" item. The announcement of Margaret Thatcher's death, one of the 20th century's great leaders, gets two columns below the fold. (h/t Henry Irving)

This subtle insult by placement is better than much of the coverage in the progressive media, who felt obliged to remind readers how much they despise the Iron Lady.

MSN.UK has an article titled, "Why Margaret Thatcher was bad for Britain" since "her policies tended to involve short-term pain for many, but long-term gain for only a few."

A headline on the Huffington Post: "Paul Krugman: Margaret Thatcher Shouldn't Get Too Much Credit."

This gem on a site called Sabotage Times has 190 comments last I looked.

"The Best Way To Deal With Margaret Thatcher's Legacy Is To Kill It":

"Margaret Thatcher is dead. No doubt now we'll have to deal with people claiming she made Britain. She didn't, and we should all turn our backs on her funeral cortege in silence as it drives by."

The article goes on to enumerate the "true legacy of the most pitiless, inhumane, greedy, venal and megalomaniacal creature ever to cross the threshold of 10 Downing Street."

Here's someone called John Fugelsang on Current TV:

"Now, many progressives said some genuinely mean, nasty things about Mrs. Thatcher today. I don't think it's necessary to do that when all one really needs to do is just list off a few of her policies.

"You see, I wanted to find a way to appropriately honor Mrs. Thatcher's policies today, so I called Nelson Mandela a terrorist.

"Then I busted some unions, I took milk away from poor children, I supported the regimes of Saddam Hussein and Augusto Pinochet, I cut taxes for the rich and widened the poverty gap, I sold off England's basic utilities so people could pay a whole lot more for electricity and water in the U.K., then I insulted working people by saying any man who travels by bus is a failure - all this whilst urinating on miners and setting up a disastrous economy that the people of the U.K. are paying for with austerity today.

"Oh, and I supported apartheid and called Mandela a terrorist - I mentioned that, right?

"Now you see, that's kind of mean, but it's the truth, and you're not supposed to say hateful things about a world leader on the day they die. And I know this 'cause I heard it all day from all my Republican friends who said hateful things about Hugo Chavez on the day he died."

Hugo Chavez is the hero Mr. Fugelsang compares to Margaret Thatcher. Kind of says it all.

 

Two stories appear above the fold on the front page of today's Boston Globe: one about "license plate-reading devices" and one on a transportation bill passing the House. A photo of Annette Funicello in her Mickey Mouse ears also appears above the fold in an "In the News" item. The announcement of Margaret Thatcher's death, one of the 20th century's great leaders, gets two columns below the fold. (h/t Henry Irving)

This subtle insult by placement is better than much of the coverage in the progressive media, who felt obliged to remind readers how much they despise the Iron Lady.

MSN.UK has an article titled, "Why Margaret Thatcher was bad for Britain" since "her policies tended to involve short-term pain for many, but long-term gain for only a few."

A headline on the Huffington Post: "Paul Krugman: Margaret Thatcher Shouldn't Get Too Much Credit."

This gem on a site called Sabotage Times has 190 comments last I looked.

"The Best Way To Deal With Margaret Thatcher's Legacy Is To Kill It":

"Margaret Thatcher is dead. No doubt now we'll have to deal with people claiming she made Britain. She didn't, and we should all turn our backs on her funeral cortege in silence as it drives by."

The article goes on to enumerate the "true legacy of the most pitiless, inhumane, greedy, venal and megalomaniacal creature ever to cross the threshold of 10 Downing Street."

Here's someone called John Fugelsang on Current TV:

"Now, many progressives said some genuinely mean, nasty things about Mrs. Thatcher today. I don't think it's necessary to do that when all one really needs to do is just list off a few of her policies.

"You see, I wanted to find a way to appropriately honor Mrs. Thatcher's policies today, so I called Nelson Mandela a terrorist.

"Then I busted some unions, I took milk away from poor children, I supported the regimes of Saddam Hussein and Augusto Pinochet, I cut taxes for the rich and widened the poverty gap, I sold off England's basic utilities so people could pay a whole lot more for electricity and water in the U.K., then I insulted working people by saying any man who travels by bus is a failure - all this whilst urinating on miners and setting up a disastrous economy that the people of the U.K. are paying for with austerity today.

"Oh, and I supported apartheid and called Mandela a terrorist - I mentioned that, right?

"Now you see, that's kind of mean, but it's the truth, and you're not supposed to say hateful things about a world leader on the day they die. And I know this 'cause I heard it all day from all my Republican friends who said hateful things about Hugo Chavez on the day he died."

Hugo Chavez is the hero Mr. Fugelsang compares to Margaret Thatcher. Kind of says it all.

 

RECENT VIDEOS