Attention GOP Leadership! Start here

Richard Pollack at the Washington Examiner reports on a painless way to  handle sequester costs -- cut out the unnecessary duplicative federal programs:

Duplicative drug abuse and treatment services are strewn over 76 federal programs. Housing services are spread across 20 different agencies. Renewable energy projects go through 23 federal agencies and 130 sub-agencies.

Even federal catfish inspections are done by three different agencies.

These are only a few of 162 examples identified by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, a congressional watchdog agency, of fragmented, duplicative federal programs and services.

The 2013 edition of the annual report originally requested by Sen. Tom Coburn, R-OK, is being released today and it concludes that not only does such managerial dysfunction hobble the federal government, it's also extraordinarily costly.

"The $95 billion in overlap identified in this report, combined with the $200 billion in overlap identified in GAO's previous two reports, could easily cover the costs of sequestration," Coburn told The Washington Examiner.

 

Richard Pollack at the Washington Examiner reports on a painless way to  handle sequester costs -- cut out the unnecessary duplicative federal programs:

Duplicative drug abuse and treatment services are strewn over 76 federal programs. Housing services are spread across 20 different agencies. Renewable energy projects go through 23 federal agencies and 130 sub-agencies.

Even federal catfish inspections are done by three different agencies.

These are only a few of 162 examples identified by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, a congressional watchdog agency, of fragmented, duplicative federal programs and services.

The 2013 edition of the annual report originally requested by Sen. Tom Coburn, R-OK, is being released today and it concludes that not only does such managerial dysfunction hobble the federal government, it's also extraordinarily costly.

"The $95 billion in overlap identified in this report, combined with the $200 billion in overlap identified in GAO's previous two reports, could easily cover the costs of sequestration," Coburn told The Washington Examiner.

 

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