Syrian with ties to 9/11 hijackers relaxing in the New Jersey suburbs

Rick Moran
And he's virtually untouchable now that he has been granted asylum. Makes you wonder what this guy might do for an encore:

Free to do as he pleases, living out his days in the suburbs of northern New Jersey, a Syrian national who is a known associate of the 9/11 hijackers never has to worry about deportation by the U.S. government, according to an investigation by Fox Files.

With nearly 400,000 people waiting for U.S. citizenship, Daoud Chehazeh last November received political asylum for a third time after a series of bureaucratic screw ups at the federal level, according to a review of court documents and interviews with former federal and state investigators.

"It's a slap in the face to Americans, especially the victims of 9/11 and the families," said Jim Bush, who as a New Jersey state criminal investigator was part of the 9/11 investigation code-named PENTTBOMB. His partner in the investigation was Bob Bukowski, a now-retired FBI special agent.

"Three thousand people were murdered," Bukowski said. "(Chehazeh) was definitely part of that conspiracy. ... He facilitated the moves and protection up to the whole flight, basically, of Flight 77. Could we prove that in a court of law? No. But there are other remedies. Deport him. That's what should have been done in this case."

What did Chehazeh do for the hijackers?

Rababah got the hijackers an apartment in Virginia.  He helped them get settled.   And in May 2001, Rababah drove al-Hazmi, Hanjour and two of the newly arrived muscle hijackers to Connecticut and New Jersey. The 9/11 Commission Report said that within a few weeks seven of the hijackers were living in New Jersey in a one-room apartment.

Bukowski and Bush are still haunted by a piece of evidence.

"When (Chehazeh) was arrested, in his car we found booklets, flight information from (New Jersey's) Teterboro Airport, where we know Hani Hanjour, again the pilot, practiced out of,"  Bush said. Chehazeh "didn't know how the hell they got there."

Chehazeh was also a known associate of the terrorist preacher Anwar al-Awlaki who probably had more to do with 9/11 than the government has previously admitted.

This kind of thing happens for too often - terrorists slipping through the cracks. Unless he is deported, the government is going to spend precious money and time tracking this guy's movements when the entire problem could have been solved by simply deporting him.


And he's virtually untouchable now that he has been granted asylum. Makes you wonder what this guy might do for an encore:

Free to do as he pleases, living out his days in the suburbs of northern New Jersey, a Syrian national who is a known associate of the 9/11 hijackers never has to worry about deportation by the U.S. government, according to an investigation by Fox Files.

With nearly 400,000 people waiting for U.S. citizenship, Daoud Chehazeh last November received political asylum for a third time after a series of bureaucratic screw ups at the federal level, according to a review of court documents and interviews with former federal and state investigators.

"It's a slap in the face to Americans, especially the victims of 9/11 and the families," said Jim Bush, who as a New Jersey state criminal investigator was part of the 9/11 investigation code-named PENTTBOMB. His partner in the investigation was Bob Bukowski, a now-retired FBI special agent.

"Three thousand people were murdered," Bukowski said. "(Chehazeh) was definitely part of that conspiracy. ... He facilitated the moves and protection up to the whole flight, basically, of Flight 77. Could we prove that in a court of law? No. But there are other remedies. Deport him. That's what should have been done in this case."

What did Chehazeh do for the hijackers?

Rababah got the hijackers an apartment in Virginia.  He helped them get settled.   And in May 2001, Rababah drove al-Hazmi, Hanjour and two of the newly arrived muscle hijackers to Connecticut and New Jersey. The 9/11 Commission Report said that within a few weeks seven of the hijackers were living in New Jersey in a one-room apartment.

Bukowski and Bush are still haunted by a piece of evidence.

"When (Chehazeh) was arrested, in his car we found booklets, flight information from (New Jersey's) Teterboro Airport, where we know Hani Hanjour, again the pilot, practiced out of,"  Bush said. Chehazeh "didn't know how the hell they got there."

Chehazeh was also a known associate of the terrorist preacher Anwar al-Awlaki who probably had more to do with 9/11 than the government has previously admitted.

This kind of thing happens for too often - terrorists slipping through the cracks. Unless he is deported, the government is going to spend precious money and time tracking this guy's movements when the entire problem could have been solved by simply deporting him.