Of Sheep, Sheepdogs, Shepherds and Wolves

Ebben Raves

The sheep, or as many call them, the sheeple, are content to graze in the pasture of television and newspapers, living their lives without a care in the world.  Some are true believers, biting at every sprig of lusciously painted foliage offered.  Most, however, are satisfied with the sustenance their current enclosure provides them. Cyprus?  Drones?  It doesn't matter to them; they go on with their lives oblivious to the world around them as long as they have March Madness and Honey Boo-Boo. Since they obey the law, why should they care?  Surely, the government is here to protect them.  They're good citizens.  In fact, the government is supposed to take care of them, isn't it?

Enter the sheepdogs -- armed servants whose job is to protect the sheep from the wolves.  Most, if not all, would acclaim that they are noble creatures.  After all, they are the ones laying their lives on the line to protect the defenseless.  Noble creatures, indeed -- it does take a special kind of individual to go into harm's way.  Never question the sheepdog, though, for they are the only ones keeping the wolves at bay.  They are the protectors of the sheep.  This has been drilled into the minds of everyone who has been in that role, myself included.  But, are they?  Who do they really protect?

Picture the shepherd, ever peaceful and vigilant, overlooking his flock in the valley below.  He knows his sheepdogs are keeping the flock in check, since he is the one that feeds them and they answer only to him.  He has his staff in hand in case he needs to reign in a sheep that has gone astray or strike a sheepdog that dares to disobey.  He is the master.  The sheep give their wool and eventually, their flesh to him; the sheepdogs their lives.  Few know it: all accept it.

The wolves?  Why, they're who the shepherd says they are, of course.

Ebben Raves is a veteran, constitutional activist, and speaker who teaches American history and has been a guest on several talk radio shows.  He can be reached at ebshumidors@yahoo.com.




 

The sheep, or as many call them, the sheeple, are content to graze in the pasture of television and newspapers, living their lives without a care in the world.  Some are true believers, biting at every sprig of lusciously painted foliage offered.  Most, however, are satisfied with the sustenance their current enclosure provides them. Cyprus?  Drones?  It doesn't matter to them; they go on with their lives oblivious to the world around them as long as they have March Madness and Honey Boo-Boo. Since they obey the law, why should they care?  Surely, the government is here to protect them.  They're good citizens.  In fact, the government is supposed to take care of them, isn't it?

Enter the sheepdogs -- armed servants whose job is to protect the sheep from the wolves.  Most, if not all, would acclaim that they are noble creatures.  After all, they are the ones laying their lives on the line to protect the defenseless.  Noble creatures, indeed -- it does take a special kind of individual to go into harm's way.  Never question the sheepdog, though, for they are the only ones keeping the wolves at bay.  They are the protectors of the sheep.  This has been drilled into the minds of everyone who has been in that role, myself included.  But, are they?  Who do they really protect?

Picture the shepherd, ever peaceful and vigilant, overlooking his flock in the valley below.  He knows his sheepdogs are keeping the flock in check, since he is the one that feeds them and they answer only to him.  He has his staff in hand in case he needs to reign in a sheep that has gone astray or strike a sheepdog that dares to disobey.  He is the master.  The sheep give their wool and eventually, their flesh to him; the sheepdogs their lives.  Few know it: all accept it.

The wolves?  Why, they're who the shepherd says they are, of course.

Ebben Raves is a veteran, constitutional activist, and speaker who teaches American history and has been a guest on several talk radio shows.  He can be reached at ebshumidors@yahoo.com.