Harvard: Love it or Leave it

Thomas Lifson
According to the editors of the Harvard Crimson, conservatives who find aspects of the liberal dominance of Harvard troubling, should not even bother applying.  We don't want your kind around here.

And if they have graduated, they should keep their damn mouths shut about the blemishes they see on their alma mater, if they are conservative. Diversity of thought is not the kind of diversity they celebrate, at least among the Crimson staff.

Warning: Do Not Enroll

If you might want to insult Harvard down the line, go elsewhere

If you think Harvard is a revolutionary communist hotbed, don't apply. If you think Harvard is full of "pinheaded" professors, don't enroll. And if you think Harvard pollutes the minds of its students, don't walk out of here with a degree-and certainly don't get two.

You see, lately, there seems to be a pernicious trend of public figures-especially those on the right-falling in love with Harvard just long enough to benefit from its educational resources and, yes, its social prestige, before turning against our school. Just recently, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas affirmed his belief that Harvard Law School was, during his years as a student there, home to a cohort of "Marxists who believed in...overthrowing the United States government." In November, Fox News pundit and Harvard Kennedy School graduate Bill O'Reilly glibly referred to Harvard professors as "pinheaded" while implying that the Harvard community is morally suspect for its acceptance of Harvard College Munch, a group for students who share an interest in kinky sex. And last April, presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who holds a J.D. and MBA from our fine institution, lambasted President Obama for having spent "too much time at Harvard."

Such episodes of treachery are apparently attempts to curry favor with the more anti-intellectual members of our body politic. Yet it is finally time that we say enough is enough. We at The Crimson urge anyone who plans on one day scoring political points by maligning Harvard to neither apply, enroll, nor graduate from this fine institution.

If you don't agree with us, don't be part of our pseudo-diversity.

College Insurrection calls the tone of the editorial "whiny" and that it is. But there is also a most unappealing arrogance and condescension about it. "If only we could have spoken to a young, wide-eyed Ted Cruz, Mitt Romney, or Bill O'Reilly. We would have assured them that it was okay to be anti-intellectual, and that millions of people around the world do it every day."

The completely unreflective assumption is that intellectualism is the property of Harvard, and that as undergraduates there, the editors can define any public deviation from agreement that everything at Harvard is perfect, as anti-intellectualism. These youngsters consider themselves olympians, having polished their high school records enough to get into Harvard, and then becoming someing of a Big Man (or Woman or Transgender) On Campus by getting onto the Crimson staff.

Having spent about two decades at Harvard myself, as student (3 degrees) and faculty member (2 faculties), I both love the place and am pained at the left's takeover of so many aspects of university life. I guess that makes me anti-intellectual, too.

According to the editors of the Harvard Crimson, conservatives who find aspects of the liberal dominance of Harvard troubling, should not even bother applying.  We don't want your kind around here.

And if they have graduated, they should keep their damn mouths shut about the blemishes they see on their alma mater, if they are conservative. Diversity of thought is not the kind of diversity they celebrate, at least among the Crimson staff.

Warning: Do Not Enroll

If you might want to insult Harvard down the line, go elsewhere

If you think Harvard is a revolutionary communist hotbed, don't apply. If you think Harvard is full of "pinheaded" professors, don't enroll. And if you think Harvard pollutes the minds of its students, don't walk out of here with a degree-and certainly don't get two.

You see, lately, there seems to be a pernicious trend of public figures-especially those on the right-falling in love with Harvard just long enough to benefit from its educational resources and, yes, its social prestige, before turning against our school. Just recently, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas affirmed his belief that Harvard Law School was, during his years as a student there, home to a cohort of "Marxists who believed in...overthrowing the United States government." In November, Fox News pundit and Harvard Kennedy School graduate Bill O'Reilly glibly referred to Harvard professors as "pinheaded" while implying that the Harvard community is morally suspect for its acceptance of Harvard College Munch, a group for students who share an interest in kinky sex. And last April, presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who holds a J.D. and MBA from our fine institution, lambasted President Obama for having spent "too much time at Harvard."

Such episodes of treachery are apparently attempts to curry favor with the more anti-intellectual members of our body politic. Yet it is finally time that we say enough is enough. We at The Crimson urge anyone who plans on one day scoring political points by maligning Harvard to neither apply, enroll, nor graduate from this fine institution.

If you don't agree with us, don't be part of our pseudo-diversity.

College Insurrection calls the tone of the editorial "whiny" and that it is. But there is also a most unappealing arrogance and condescension about it. "If only we could have spoken to a young, wide-eyed Ted Cruz, Mitt Romney, or Bill O'Reilly. We would have assured them that it was okay to be anti-intellectual, and that millions of people around the world do it every day."

The completely unreflective assumption is that intellectualism is the property of Harvard, and that as undergraduates there, the editors can define any public deviation from agreement that everything at Harvard is perfect, as anti-intellectualism. These youngsters consider themselves olympians, having polished their high school records enough to get into Harvard, and then becoming someing of a Big Man (or Woman or Transgender) On Campus by getting onto the Crimson staff.

Having spent about two decades at Harvard myself, as student (3 degrees) and faculty member (2 faculties), I both love the place and am pained at the left's takeover of so many aspects of university life. I guess that makes me anti-intellectual, too.