For Obama, popularity is a fleeting thing

Rick Moran
In December, the president's approval rating stood at a lofty 56$ as he basked in the afterglow of the November election.

Today, following the sequester taking effect, the American people seem to be changing their minds about him.

Politico:

President Obama's job approval rating took a hit over the weekend, falling to its lowest level in the Gallup three-day average since his reelection.

His approval rating was 46 percent between Feb 29 and March 2, down from 53 percent a week earlier.

The drop comes after Obama and Congress failed to reach a last-minute deal and automatic sequester cuts kicked in across the government on Friday.

His disapproval rating also jumped to its highest level since November, hitting 46 percent over the weekend, up from 40 percent a week earlier.

Gallup surveys roughly 1,500 adults across the nation each day and records the average ratings over three days. The margin of error is +/- 3 percentage points.

It's the sharp rise in his disapproval rating that makes me suspect this is in response to Frankenquester. People don't believe the president's predictions of catastrophe, and might resent being used as pawns in his gamesmanship with Republicans.

This certainly doesn't help the president advance his agenda in Congress, which includes gun control, immigration reform, and climate change. Several Democrats are already skittish about their re-elections and without strong approval ratings, they have no reason to go out on a limb for the leader of their party.

In December, the president's approval rating stood at a lofty 56$ as he basked in the afterglow of the November election.

Today, following the sequester taking effect, the American people seem to be changing their minds about him.

Politico:

President Obama's job approval rating took a hit over the weekend, falling to its lowest level in the Gallup three-day average since his reelection.

His approval rating was 46 percent between Feb 29 and March 2, down from 53 percent a week earlier.

The drop comes after Obama and Congress failed to reach a last-minute deal and automatic sequester cuts kicked in across the government on Friday.

His disapproval rating also jumped to its highest level since November, hitting 46 percent over the weekend, up from 40 percent a week earlier.

Gallup surveys roughly 1,500 adults across the nation each day and records the average ratings over three days. The margin of error is +/- 3 percentage points.

It's the sharp rise in his disapproval rating that makes me suspect this is in response to Frankenquester. People don't believe the president's predictions of catastrophe, and might resent being used as pawns in his gamesmanship with Republicans.

This certainly doesn't help the president advance his agenda in Congress, which includes gun control, immigration reform, and climate change. Several Democrats are already skittish about their re-elections and without strong approval ratings, they have no reason to go out on a limb for the leader of their party.