Are Democrats backing away from Ashley Judd?

Rick Moran
Practical politics will usually win out. And in the case of Ashley Judd's probable challenge in Kentucky to Senator Mitch McConnell, the ideological layout of the state is telling Democrats that the celeb doesn't have much of a chance.

Washington Times:

Democratic Party leaders are stepping back and taking a clear look at the candidate, and some say she may not be best to run against the five-term Kentucky senator in 2014, Newsmax reports.

"She's going to have a tough road to hoe," said Jim Cauley, campaign manager for Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear in 2007, in a ThisWeek.com report. "She doesn't fit the damn state," which is a conservative stronghold. Fully 60 percent of Kentuckians voted for Mitt Romney in 2012.

Democrats have begun expressing concern about some of Ms. Judd's statements and views. ThisWeek.com reports, "Democrats worry that Judd, a political neophyte, could cost the party a winnable race."

And the National Journal reports, "the honeymoon is over for Ashley Judd." The actress had traveled to Washington, D.C., a few weeks ago to meet with top Democratic Party officials, including those with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the campaign arm of House Democrats.

McConnell's people are licking their chops for an opportunity to run against the comely actress. Read this account from City Paper of a speech she made back in 2008 and you'll understand why:

Judd's has a reputation for her vocabulary-she reportedly learns a  new word a day-and space-cadet tangents. Her keynote address at Friday's gala did not disappoint. Judd explained how traveling with YouthAIDS changed her life (and rocked her soul). She'd made a "sacred commitment" to "speak truth to power...It is my pact with the god of my understanding." Sweet and self-deprecating, the star admitted she had worked late into the night  trying to compose her speech. Sitting in her farmhouse, "with the first autumnal fire crackling," she agonized over how to talk about her most recent travels as YouthAIDS global ambassador. Then inspiration hit. "I couldn't tell you about Rwanda or the DRC," she said. The experience was too awful. She realized she had to begin at the end, with "The Calamity of Coming Home," as she titled the entry in her diary.

Not only is Judd too liberal. She's just too weird to be Senator.



Practical politics will usually win out. And in the case of Ashley Judd's probable challenge in Kentucky to Senator Mitch McConnell, the ideological layout of the state is telling Democrats that the celeb doesn't have much of a chance.

Washington Times:

Democratic Party leaders are stepping back and taking a clear look at the candidate, and some say she may not be best to run against the five-term Kentucky senator in 2014, Newsmax reports.

"She's going to have a tough road to hoe," said Jim Cauley, campaign manager for Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear in 2007, in a ThisWeek.com report. "She doesn't fit the damn state," which is a conservative stronghold. Fully 60 percent of Kentuckians voted for Mitt Romney in 2012.

Democrats have begun expressing concern about some of Ms. Judd's statements and views. ThisWeek.com reports, "Democrats worry that Judd, a political neophyte, could cost the party a winnable race."

And the National Journal reports, "the honeymoon is over for Ashley Judd." The actress had traveled to Washington, D.C., a few weeks ago to meet with top Democratic Party officials, including those with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the campaign arm of House Democrats.

McConnell's people are licking their chops for an opportunity to run against the comely actress. Read this account from City Paper of a speech she made back in 2008 and you'll understand why:

Judd's has a reputation for her vocabulary-she reportedly learns a  new word a day-and space-cadet tangents. Her keynote address at Friday's gala did not disappoint. Judd explained how traveling with YouthAIDS changed her life (and rocked her soul). She'd made a "sacred commitment" to "speak truth to power...It is my pact with the god of my understanding." Sweet and self-deprecating, the star admitted she had worked late into the night  trying to compose her speech. Sitting in her farmhouse, "with the first autumnal fire crackling," she agonized over how to talk about her most recent travels as YouthAIDS global ambassador. Then inspiration hit. "I couldn't tell you about Rwanda or the DRC," she said. The experience was too awful. She realized she had to begin at the end, with "The Calamity of Coming Home," as she titled the entry in her diary.

Not only is Judd too liberal. She's just too weird to be Senator.