Pentagon isn't sure if it's buying oil from Iran for Afghanistan

The Pentagon has contracted out the job of buying oil for the Afghan security services to more than a dozen contractors. Unfortunately, it appears that a couple of those contractors are violating the sanctions by purchasing crude oil from Iran.

Josh Rogin:

The Defense Department has no idea whether or not it is violating U.S. sanctions by indirectly purchasing Iranian oil for the Afghan security forces, according to a new report by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR).

The United States paid for the purchase and delivery of fuel to the Afghan security forces for years, totaling $1.1 billion for just the Afghan army since 2007. But the Pentagon's lack of internal controls means that some of that fuel might have come from Iran, the SIGAR office found. New checks and balances were put in place last year, but there is still a risk that U.S. taxpayer funds are being sent to Iran.

"DOD's lack of visibility-until recently-over the source of fuel purchased for the ANSF raises some concerns," the new report stated. "DOD lacked certification procedures prior to November 2012 and had limited visibility over the import and delivery sub-contracts used by fuel vendors. As a result, DOD is unable to determine if any of the $1.1 billion in fuel purchased for the ANA between fiscal year 2007 and 2012 came from Iran, in violation of U.S. economic sanctions."

The SIGAR office was following up on a few allegations of improprieties with the purchase of fuel for the Afghan forces from undisclosed sources. SIGAR didn't find any direct evidence that sanctions against Iran were being violated, but rather issued the report as a warning that the risk of sanctions violations exists.

Between 2007 and 2012, there is no information on where the fuel that America was buying for the Afghan security forces was coming from, the report notes.

The IG now says that better controls are in place to prevent the contractors from buying from Iran, but that's cold comfort. Iran is already skirting the EU oil sanctions by utilizing a series of false flags on tankers, dummy corporations, and  bribery. In truth, Iranian oil exports have risen to their highest level since the EU sanctions were imposed.

Let's hope the Pentagon has locked down the process and won't buy any more rope from the mullahs to hang us.



The Pentagon has contracted out the job of buying oil for the Afghan security services to more than a dozen contractors. Unfortunately, it appears that a couple of those contractors are violating the sanctions by purchasing crude oil from Iran.

Josh Rogin:

The Defense Department has no idea whether or not it is violating U.S. sanctions by indirectly purchasing Iranian oil for the Afghan security forces, according to a new report by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR).

The United States paid for the purchase and delivery of fuel to the Afghan security forces for years, totaling $1.1 billion for just the Afghan army since 2007. But the Pentagon's lack of internal controls means that some of that fuel might have come from Iran, the SIGAR office found. New checks and balances were put in place last year, but there is still a risk that U.S. taxpayer funds are being sent to Iran.

"DOD's lack of visibility-until recently-over the source of fuel purchased for the ANSF raises some concerns," the new report stated. "DOD lacked certification procedures prior to November 2012 and had limited visibility over the import and delivery sub-contracts used by fuel vendors. As a result, DOD is unable to determine if any of the $1.1 billion in fuel purchased for the ANA between fiscal year 2007 and 2012 came from Iran, in violation of U.S. economic sanctions."

The SIGAR office was following up on a few allegations of improprieties with the purchase of fuel for the Afghan forces from undisclosed sources. SIGAR didn't find any direct evidence that sanctions against Iran were being violated, but rather issued the report as a warning that the risk of sanctions violations exists.

Between 2007 and 2012, there is no information on where the fuel that America was buying for the Afghan security forces was coming from, the report notes.

The IG now says that better controls are in place to prevent the contractors from buying from Iran, but that's cold comfort. Iran is already skirting the EU oil sanctions by utilizing a series of false flags on tankers, dummy corporations, and  bribery. In truth, Iranian oil exports have risen to their highest level since the EU sanctions were imposed.

Let's hope the Pentagon has locked down the process and won't buy any more rope from the mullahs to hang us.



RECENT VIDEOS