On Hatred: Good Riddance Josef Mengele

Steve Delaney
Today is February 7th, 2013: the thirty third anniversary of Josef Mengele's relatively serene death by drowning in the ocean. Better than he deserved, but at least we don't have to breathe the same air as that monstrosity.

It is not considered politically correct to hate, but hatred is a rational response to perpetrators of evil. Hatred should be reserved for, and directed at, those who take pleasure in dehumanizing and maiming others - either in pursuit of power, or merely out of sociopathic mentality. Hatred is a proper response to evil.

In today's political climate, hate is considered a transgression. It has come too often to be defined by the feelings of one offended party, regarding the presumed intentions of another party. Especially by the Left, evil is rejected as a concept, as is belief in an objective moral standard.

Given this mercurial regard for morality, it is hardly surprising that Mengele's brethren Mao Zedong, Vladimir Lenin, and Che Guevara are celebrated, their flaws being compensated for by their effectiveness at promoting Leftism. If the logo wear and slogans abundantly observable on our Universities' campuses are any indication, there is far more hate for Mitt Romney and Sarah Palin than there is for Kim Jong-un, who presides over a nation that bears great resemblance to a concentration camp.

This is not to pretend that there are none on the Right who need to step back and keep their hatred in check; I have read with disappointment some ugly invective about politicians for whom, while I long to see then defeated, I harbor no hatred. But I see no comparison on the Right vis a vis the frequent hatred from Leftists toward their political adversaries. I see no longing on the Right to trade judgement of evil for moral relativism. My assertion is this: properly recognizing evil, and rejecting it and its purveyors, is not a priority for the Left. Conversely, trying to understand what led a person to commit evil, and to be sympathetic toward their circumstances rather than to their victims, is not a practice embraced by the Right.

On this anniversary of the day one of the most hated human beings finally lost his life and faced his ultimate judgement, I am reminded that hatred is not inherently evil, that hatred of evil is moral and virtuous. I am convinced that that outright rejection of hatred does not diminish hatred: it merely provides fertile ground for hatred's misdirection

Today is February 7th, 2013: the thirty third anniversary of Josef Mengele's relatively serene death by drowning in the ocean. Better than he deserved, but at least we don't have to breathe the same air as that monstrosity.

It is not considered politically correct to hate, but hatred is a rational response to perpetrators of evil. Hatred should be reserved for, and directed at, those who take pleasure in dehumanizing and maiming others - either in pursuit of power, or merely out of sociopathic mentality. Hatred is a proper response to evil.

In today's political climate, hate is considered a transgression. It has come too often to be defined by the feelings of one offended party, regarding the presumed intentions of another party. Especially by the Left, evil is rejected as a concept, as is belief in an objective moral standard.

Given this mercurial regard for morality, it is hardly surprising that Mengele's brethren Mao Zedong, Vladimir Lenin, and Che Guevara are celebrated, their flaws being compensated for by their effectiveness at promoting Leftism. If the logo wear and slogans abundantly observable on our Universities' campuses are any indication, there is far more hate for Mitt Romney and Sarah Palin than there is for Kim Jong-un, who presides over a nation that bears great resemblance to a concentration camp.

This is not to pretend that there are none on the Right who need to step back and keep their hatred in check; I have read with disappointment some ugly invective about politicians for whom, while I long to see then defeated, I harbor no hatred. But I see no comparison on the Right vis a vis the frequent hatred from Leftists toward their political adversaries. I see no longing on the Right to trade judgement of evil for moral relativism. My assertion is this: properly recognizing evil, and rejecting it and its purveyors, is not a priority for the Left. Conversely, trying to understand what led a person to commit evil, and to be sympathetic toward their circumstances rather than to their victims, is not a practice embraced by the Right.

On this anniversary of the day one of the most hated human beings finally lost his life and faced his ultimate judgement, I am reminded that hatred is not inherently evil, that hatred of evil is moral and virtuous. I am convinced that that outright rejection of hatred does not diminish hatred: it merely provides fertile ground for hatred's misdirection