Get out of Jail Free Card for Muslims in Spain

John-Pierre Maeli
Ever since the kingdoms of Castile and Aragon drove out the Muslim Moors in what is properly named the Reconquista (The Recapturing) Muslim groups have been longing for the moment when they finally reclaim what is rightfully theirs. This is especially true when it comes to the former Cordoba mosque, which is now a cathedral.

All had been relatively quiet at the Córdoba Cathedral for more than 750 years, until January 2004, when Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden began encouraging Muslims to "reconquer" Spain for Islam by declaring it to be "the lost Al-Andalus." Many Muslims believe that much of Spain still belongs to them, and that they have every right to return and establish their rule there.

So it's not surprising that eight Muslims were acquitted of using violence to break a ban on Muslim prayers in the Cordoba Cathedral. During a tour of the Cathedral by a group of Muslims from Austria, eight Muslims unrolled their prayer rugs, kneeled down and then proceeded to pray loudly. However, things got violent when the Muslims decided to attack the security guards who told them to stop.

Then it got worse, when a dozen police officers were called in to arrest the Muslim offenders. When the melee finally ended, two security guards were injured in what appeared to be a planned attack.

However, despite security cameras recording the event and the fact that the Muslim rioters used walkie-talkies to communicate the attack, the judge acquitted eight Muslim individuals who staged the altercation in the Cathedral on March 31, 2010.

The Judge's decision brings up worries that it's just another way to appease a sensitive Muslim community. In addition, there are fears that there was more behind the Judge's decision than just appeasement.

Some observers have speculated that the judge's decision may have been politically motivated. They point to the fact that before becoming a judge, Rascón was a politician with the Spanish Socialist Party, which is firmly committed to multiculturalism and has long sought to undermine the influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Spanish society.

Knowing the behavior of many Western officials to Islam in general, it's most likely a combination of both. As the Muslim population continues to increase in Europe, so too will their political influence. As a result, political figures will be less willing to paint any Muslim group or individual as a negative factor in society for fear of retribution.

In this case, it's not the money that counts, so much as it is the votes that keep each politician elected. And if you're not careful, it could happen here. Oh wait, it has.


John-Pierre Maeli writes weekly on his blog, The Political Informer. You can learn more by following him on Google+


Ever since the kingdoms of Castile and Aragon drove out the Muslim Moors in what is properly named the Reconquista (The Recapturing) Muslim groups have been longing for the moment when they finally reclaim what is rightfully theirs. This is especially true when it comes to the former Cordoba mosque, which is now a cathedral.

All had been relatively quiet at the Córdoba Cathedral for more than 750 years, until January 2004, when Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden began encouraging Muslims to "reconquer" Spain for Islam by declaring it to be "the lost Al-Andalus." Many Muslims believe that much of Spain still belongs to them, and that they have every right to return and establish their rule there.

So it's not surprising that eight Muslims were acquitted of using violence to break a ban on Muslim prayers in the Cordoba Cathedral. During a tour of the Cathedral by a group of Muslims from Austria, eight Muslims unrolled their prayer rugs, kneeled down and then proceeded to pray loudly. However, things got violent when the Muslims decided to attack the security guards who told them to stop.

Then it got worse, when a dozen police officers were called in to arrest the Muslim offenders. When the melee finally ended, two security guards were injured in what appeared to be a planned attack.

However, despite security cameras recording the event and the fact that the Muslim rioters used walkie-talkies to communicate the attack, the judge acquitted eight Muslim individuals who staged the altercation in the Cathedral on March 31, 2010.

The Judge's decision brings up worries that it's just another way to appease a sensitive Muslim community. In addition, there are fears that there was more behind the Judge's decision than just appeasement.

Some observers have speculated that the judge's decision may have been politically motivated. They point to the fact that before becoming a judge, Rascón was a politician with the Spanish Socialist Party, which is firmly committed to multiculturalism and has long sought to undermine the influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Spanish society.

Knowing the behavior of many Western officials to Islam in general, it's most likely a combination of both. As the Muslim population continues to increase in Europe, so too will their political influence. As a result, political figures will be less willing to paint any Muslim group or individual as a negative factor in society for fear of retribution.

In this case, it's not the money that counts, so much as it is the votes that keep each politician elected. And if you're not careful, it could happen here. Oh wait, it has.


John-Pierre Maeli writes weekly on his blog, The Political Informer. You can learn more by following him on Google+