A Case of Real Military Injustice

ABC, one of the of the usually lame-stream media networks, has a real story about denied military benefits that all the media should be following instead of the fabricated Esquire article that has garnered so much attention. Amazingly, ABC is actually reporting on the inability of the victims of the Fort Hood shooting to obtain needed medical care because of political games being played by the Obama administration.

It seems that the White House's insistence that the attack by Major Nidal Hasan was not a terrorist attack but rather an incident of workplace violence is creating bureaucratic difficulties for the victims of the shooting and their families. One of the two Fort Hood police officers who confronted Hasan, former Sgt. Kimberley Munley, who was seated next to FLOTUS for Obama's SOTU three years ago, is mincing no words in an ABC interview. She says Obama broke his promise to see that the victims would be well cared for.

 "Betrayed is a good word," former Sgt. Munley told ABC News in a tearful interview to be broadcast tonight on "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Nightline."

"Not to the least little bit have the victims been taken care of," she said. "In fact they've been neglected."

According to the report, even in the face of evidence that Hasan was communicating with the now droned dead terrorist leader, Anwar al Awlaki, who encouraged Hasan to carry out his mission of Jihad, the government's word games have had very serious consequences, so serious that Munley and dozens of others have filed suit. They claim that because of that workplace violence designation they are not receiving the care they would be were the attack properly identified as what it was, a terrorist attack. Because of political semantics, they claim they are being denied combat-related care and benefits they would be entitled to were the shooting properly classified.

One of the victims, who was shot six times and still has two bullets lodged in his body says:

"These guys play stupid every time they're asked a question about it, they pretend like they have no clue."

"It was no different than an insurgent in Iraq or Afghanistan trying to kill us," 

Manning's injuries were initially ruled combat related by a medical review board but that was overturned by Army brass higher up in the command structure, Manning says that has cost him $70,000 in lost benefits.

To get the full effect of how this administration's politically-correct insistence on denying the obvious go read the full article at ABC News website. Whereas the dubious Esquire story is being roundly denounced by military personnel, their response to this blatantly unfair treatment will likely be much more supportive and be readily seen as political interference originating at the very top of the chain of command.


ABC, one of the of the usually lame-stream media networks, has a real story about denied military benefits that all the media should be following instead of the fabricated Esquire article that has garnered so much attention. Amazingly, ABC is actually reporting on the inability of the victims of the Fort Hood shooting to obtain needed medical care because of political games being played by the Obama administration.

It seems that the White House's insistence that the attack by Major Nidal Hasan was not a terrorist attack but rather an incident of workplace violence is creating bureaucratic difficulties for the victims of the shooting and their families. One of the two Fort Hood police officers who confronted Hasan, former Sgt. Kimberley Munley, who was seated next to FLOTUS for Obama's SOTU three years ago, is mincing no words in an ABC interview. She says Obama broke his promise to see that the victims would be well cared for.

 "Betrayed is a good word," former Sgt. Munley told ABC News in a tearful interview to be broadcast tonight on "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Nightline."

"Not to the least little bit have the victims been taken care of," she said. "In fact they've been neglected."

According to the report, even in the face of evidence that Hasan was communicating with the now droned dead terrorist leader, Anwar al Awlaki, who encouraged Hasan to carry out his mission of Jihad, the government's word games have had very serious consequences, so serious that Munley and dozens of others have filed suit. They claim that because of that workplace violence designation they are not receiving the care they would be were the attack properly identified as what it was, a terrorist attack. Because of political semantics, they claim they are being denied combat-related care and benefits they would be entitled to were the shooting properly classified.

One of the victims, who was shot six times and still has two bullets lodged in his body says:

"These guys play stupid every time they're asked a question about it, they pretend like they have no clue."

"It was no different than an insurgent in Iraq or Afghanistan trying to kill us," 

Manning's injuries were initially ruled combat related by a medical review board but that was overturned by Army brass higher up in the command structure, Manning says that has cost him $70,000 in lost benefits.

To get the full effect of how this administration's politically-correct insistence on denying the obvious go read the full article at ABC News website. Whereas the dubious Esquire story is being roundly denounced by military personnel, their response to this blatantly unfair treatment will likely be much more supportive and be readily seen as political interference originating at the very top of the chain of command.


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