Piers Morgan suggests he will deport himself if gun laws aren't changed

Rick Moran
Given this whiney, teary rant in the Daily Mail, he should be deported for idiotic thinking and bad writing:

The Sandy Hook massacre brought back such horribly vivid memories for me of Dunblane, the worst mass shooting in Britain in my lifetime.

I was editor of the Daily Mirror on that day back in 1996 and will never forget the appalling TV footage of those poor Scottish mothers sprinting to the small primary school, many already howling with anguish at the thought of what might have happened to their five-year-old children.

It was a slaughter so senseless, so unspeakable, that it reduced even hard-bitten news reporters, including me, to tears.

And as I watched the parents at Sandy Hook racing to try to find their children, I saw the same images, the same terror, that engulfed Dunblane. And I felt the same tears welling up.

Then, 16 five-year-old children were slain in their classroom. Now, 20  six- and seven-year-olds. Beautiful young lives snuffed out before they had a chance to fulfil any of their potential. It made me so gut-wrenchingly angry.

I have four children. And I still remember the blind terror I felt when I lost my son Stanley, then aged two, for half an hour at a cricket match on a field surrounded by a small running creek. I was sure he'd drowned. But I was lucky: he finally emerged from where he'd been hiding - big, cheeky grin intact.

Um...is there a point to Mr. Morgan's story about losing his son for 30 minutes? No, but he thinks he can claim solidarity with parents who suffered anguish at the thought of losing their child at school shootings.

Then there's this brittle logic:

After the shootings at a cinema in Aurora, Colorado, in July - where 70 people were hit, the worst victim-count in such an incident in US history, and 12 people died - sales of guns in the state rose by a staggering 41 per cent in the following month as people bought into the theory that if everyone in the theatre had been armed too, they'd have stopped the shooter. Can you imagine the scene as 200 people pulled out guns and started blazing away in a dark theatre?

The gun-lobby logic dictates that the only way to defend against gun criminals is for everyone else to have a  gun, too. Teachers, nurses, clergymen, shop assistants, cinema usherettes - everyone must be armed.

To me, this is a warped, twisted logic that bears no statistical analysis and makes no sense. Do you fight drug addiction with more cocaine? Alcoholism with more Jack Daniel's? Of course not.

Why is owning a gun like an addiction? This is truly bizzarro reasoning and shows just how unbalanced Morgan has become. He can't think straight. And yet, we should listen to him about how to avoid another school massacre?

I'll let you read the rest of this surreal screed where he blames our love of guns on our hatred of the British following the Revolutionary War. Suffice it to say, Morgan would be much more comfortable in a country where the citizenry was unarmed - and defenseless.






Given this whiney, teary rant in the Daily Mail, he should be deported for idiotic thinking and bad writing:

The Sandy Hook massacre brought back such horribly vivid memories for me of Dunblane, the worst mass shooting in Britain in my lifetime.

I was editor of the Daily Mirror on that day back in 1996 and will never forget the appalling TV footage of those poor Scottish mothers sprinting to the small primary school, many already howling with anguish at the thought of what might have happened to their five-year-old children.

It was a slaughter so senseless, so unspeakable, that it reduced even hard-bitten news reporters, including me, to tears.

And as I watched the parents at Sandy Hook racing to try to find their children, I saw the same images, the same terror, that engulfed Dunblane. And I felt the same tears welling up.

Then, 16 five-year-old children were slain in their classroom. Now, 20  six- and seven-year-olds. Beautiful young lives snuffed out before they had a chance to fulfil any of their potential. It made me so gut-wrenchingly angry.

I have four children. And I still remember the blind terror I felt when I lost my son Stanley, then aged two, for half an hour at a cricket match on a field surrounded by a small running creek. I was sure he'd drowned. But I was lucky: he finally emerged from where he'd been hiding - big, cheeky grin intact.

Um...is there a point to Mr. Morgan's story about losing his son for 30 minutes? No, but he thinks he can claim solidarity with parents who suffered anguish at the thought of losing their child at school shootings.

Then there's this brittle logic:

After the shootings at a cinema in Aurora, Colorado, in July - where 70 people were hit, the worst victim-count in such an incident in US history, and 12 people died - sales of guns in the state rose by a staggering 41 per cent in the following month as people bought into the theory that if everyone in the theatre had been armed too, they'd have stopped the shooter. Can you imagine the scene as 200 people pulled out guns and started blazing away in a dark theatre?

The gun-lobby logic dictates that the only way to defend against gun criminals is for everyone else to have a  gun, too. Teachers, nurses, clergymen, shop assistants, cinema usherettes - everyone must be armed.

To me, this is a warped, twisted logic that bears no statistical analysis and makes no sense. Do you fight drug addiction with more cocaine? Alcoholism with more Jack Daniel's? Of course not.

Why is owning a gun like an addiction? This is truly bizzarro reasoning and shows just how unbalanced Morgan has become. He can't think straight. And yet, we should listen to him about how to avoid another school massacre?

I'll let you read the rest of this surreal screed where he blames our love of guns on our hatred of the British following the Revolutionary War. Suffice it to say, Morgan would be much more comfortable in a country where the citizenry was unarmed - and defenseless.