'We Must Never Despair'

Patrick Jakeway
In May 1780, the Continental Army suffered its worst defeat when Cornwallis took Charleston. Later that summer, Horatio Gates and the Continental Army were soundly defeated at Camden. Cornwallis planned to head north and attack Washington in Virginia. In October 1780, Washington appointed Nathaniel Greene to the command of the southern army. Between October 1780 and August 1781, Greene led a band of outgunned troops and militia in battle against Cornwallis across the Carolinas. He never commanded more than a few thousand men against Cornwallis's 30,000. In October 1780, the patriots at last inflicted a defeat on the English troops. Thereafter, it was a war of attrition and nearly every battle was "lost" in the military sense. But at the end, Cornwallis's troops dwindled to 15,000, he quit Charleston for Yorktown and the victory for liberty was secured.

General Greene's animating philosophy during the darkest times of adversity which he faced in those 10 months were defined by his quote: "I fight, I am defeated, I rise and fight again."

As you face the despondency of this moment, ask yourself: are the challenges I face worse than those which Greene faced? Does a true American patriot give up and give in when faced with daunting setbacks ? What if Greene had relented and despaired during those dark times? Where would we be? I for one will never give up; I will never give in. I have redoubled my determination and resolve.

Obama and the "Democrat-Media-complex" have won this battle. Call it our "Camden." Now, as George Washington admonished us, "we must never despair; our situation has been compromising before, and it has changed for the better; so I trust, it will again. If difficulties arise, we must put forth new exertion and proportion our efforts to the exigencies of the times."

In May 1780, the Continental Army suffered its worst defeat when Cornwallis took Charleston. Later that summer, Horatio Gates and the Continental Army were soundly defeated at Camden. Cornwallis planned to head north and attack Washington in Virginia. In October 1780, Washington appointed Nathaniel Greene to the command of the southern army. Between October 1780 and August 1781, Greene led a band of outgunned troops and militia in battle against Cornwallis across the Carolinas. He never commanded more than a few thousand men against Cornwallis's 30,000. In October 1780, the patriots at last inflicted a defeat on the English troops. Thereafter, it was a war of attrition and nearly every battle was "lost" in the military sense. But at the end, Cornwallis's troops dwindled to 15,000, he quit Charleston for Yorktown and the victory for liberty was secured.

General Greene's animating philosophy during the darkest times of adversity which he faced in those 10 months were defined by his quote: "I fight, I am defeated, I rise and fight again."

As you face the despondency of this moment, ask yourself: are the challenges I face worse than those which Greene faced? Does a true American patriot give up and give in when faced with daunting setbacks ? What if Greene had relented and despaired during those dark times? Where would we be? I for one will never give up; I will never give in. I have redoubled my determination and resolve.

Obama and the "Democrat-Media-complex" have won this battle. Call it our "Camden." Now, as George Washington admonished us, "we must never despair; our situation has been compromising before, and it has changed for the better; so I trust, it will again. If difficulties arise, we must put forth new exertion and proportion our efforts to the exigencies of the times."