Fairy prince waiting for his mum to die thinks he's 'running out of time'

Poor Prince Charles. It's got to be tough waiting around for your mother to die before you can really begin to have fun as a once and future royal. All those really kewl parades and pomp and circumstance and such. And then there's that great big stipend of cash, courtesy of the British taxpayer, that keeps hearth and home together - as well as feeding the polo ponies and vast retinue of servants.

Waiting around has apparently gotten to Chucky, as this interview in the Telegraph makes clear:

During a visit to Dumfries House, the stately home in East Ayrshire which the Prince helped save for the nation, he joked about his reputation for pursuing projects with notorious vigour but made a poignant reference to his mortality.

He said: "Impatient? Me? What a thing to suggest! Yes of course I am." He added: "I'll run out of time soon. I shall have snuffed it if I'm not careful."

The comments, which were recorded for a film on the Clarence House website about the Prince's involvement with Dumfries House, will fuel ongoing speculation that Prince Charles, 64, is more eager than ever to take the throne after 60 years of waiting.

In 2008, he became the longest-waiting heir to the throne in British history, overtaking his great-great grandfather, Edward VII.

While royal aides insist that he is fulfilled by his current role as heir apparent, supporting the Queen and being actively involved with the Prince's Trust and his numerous other charities, many royal commentators have suggested that he feels frustrated his reign has not yet begun.

With a history of longevity in his family - the Queen is 86 and in good health while Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother lived to the age of 101 - Prince Charles may yet have a while to wait until he succeeds his mother.

The Prince has previously hinted at his impatience with the long wait for succession. In 1992, on the eve of the Queen's 40th anniversary on the throne, he attended the funeral of his father-in-law, the 8th Earl Spencer, where he is believed to have remarked to Charles Spencer, his then brother-in-law: "You are fortunate enough to have succeeded to the title when still young."

After making his first wife absolutely miserable by playing around on her with his second wife, we are supposed to feel sorry for this in-bred dufus of a man who, with all the money in the world, can't find anything to do to make his life relevant?

In the NFL draft, the last man chosen is called "Mr. Irrelevant." If Charles wants a title, maybe he could claim that one.

Royalty is anachronistic. It is based on the false assumption that some human beings are better than others because of who their father and mother were. The belief that you can breed superior children like you can breed a race horse is so 17th century - the entire notion of royalty, titles, peerages, and the like having any place in a modern world that is filled with people born in slums who have outstripped the accomplishments of their supposed betters is fatuous and false.

It is a criminal use of taxpayer money to support these people. Time to end the idea of royalty and aristocracy once and for all.


Poor Prince Charles. It's got to be tough waiting around for your mother to die before you can really begin to have fun as a once and future royal. All those really kewl parades and pomp and circumstance and such. And then there's that great big stipend of cash, courtesy of the British taxpayer, that keeps hearth and home together - as well as feeding the polo ponies and vast retinue of servants.

Waiting around has apparently gotten to Chucky, as this interview in the Telegraph makes clear:

During a visit to Dumfries House, the stately home in East Ayrshire which the Prince helped save for the nation, he joked about his reputation for pursuing projects with notorious vigour but made a poignant reference to his mortality.

He said: "Impatient? Me? What a thing to suggest! Yes of course I am." He added: "I'll run out of time soon. I shall have snuffed it if I'm not careful."

The comments, which were recorded for a film on the Clarence House website about the Prince's involvement with Dumfries House, will fuel ongoing speculation that Prince Charles, 64, is more eager than ever to take the throne after 60 years of waiting.

In 2008, he became the longest-waiting heir to the throne in British history, overtaking his great-great grandfather, Edward VII.

While royal aides insist that he is fulfilled by his current role as heir apparent, supporting the Queen and being actively involved with the Prince's Trust and his numerous other charities, many royal commentators have suggested that he feels frustrated his reign has not yet begun.

With a history of longevity in his family - the Queen is 86 and in good health while Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother lived to the age of 101 - Prince Charles may yet have a while to wait until he succeeds his mother.

The Prince has previously hinted at his impatience with the long wait for succession. In 1992, on the eve of the Queen's 40th anniversary on the throne, he attended the funeral of his father-in-law, the 8th Earl Spencer, where he is believed to have remarked to Charles Spencer, his then brother-in-law: "You are fortunate enough to have succeeded to the title when still young."

After making his first wife absolutely miserable by playing around on her with his second wife, we are supposed to feel sorry for this in-bred dufus of a man who, with all the money in the world, can't find anything to do to make his life relevant?

In the NFL draft, the last man chosen is called "Mr. Irrelevant." If Charles wants a title, maybe he could claim that one.

Royalty is anachronistic. It is based on the false assumption that some human beings are better than others because of who their father and mother were. The belief that you can breed superior children like you can breed a race horse is so 17th century - the entire notion of royalty, titles, peerages, and the like having any place in a modern world that is filled with people born in slums who have outstripped the accomplishments of their supposed betters is fatuous and false.

It is a criminal use of taxpayer money to support these people. Time to end the idea of royalty and aristocracy once and for all.


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