Could Harry Reid Become VP Under Romney?

Is it possible that Harry Reid could end up as vice president in a Romney Administration?

Yes it is, and here's how it could happen.

In order to win the presidency, a candidate must win a simple majority of the 538 available electorate college votes, which amounts to a minimum of 270 or more.

Since 538 is divisible by 2, that means that there could be a tie if each candidate should happen to win 269 votes.

In the unlikely scenario that there is a split decision in the electoral college, the constitutional solution would be the following:

The House of Representatives would nominate and vote to determine the winner of the office of the presidency. Since the House is controlled by the Republicans it's a foregone conclusion that Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate, would become our next president.

On the VP side, the Senate would make the selection. Nominations would take place and the full Senate would then vote to determine who the next vice president would be.

Since the Senate is controlled by the Democrats, it's certain that a Democrat would be nominated and selected to serve as VP in the new Romney administration.

But, it's not certain that the senate would necessarily nominate and select Joe Biden for the VP slot. The Senate could essentially nominate anyone they choose. As the Senate majority leader, it's very possible that Harry Reid could submit himself as the nominee for the senate to vote on.

If this unlikely but entirely feasible scenario should play out, we could end up with a very awkward and stunning outcome as we the voters witness the swearing in of a Romney/Reid presidency on January 20, 2013.

Is it possible that Harry Reid could end up as vice president in a Romney Administration?

Yes it is, and here's how it could happen.

In order to win the presidency, a candidate must win a simple majority of the 538 available electorate college votes, which amounts to a minimum of 270 or more.

Since 538 is divisible by 2, that means that there could be a tie if each candidate should happen to win 269 votes.

In the unlikely scenario that there is a split decision in the electoral college, the constitutional solution would be the following:

The House of Representatives would nominate and vote to determine the winner of the office of the presidency. Since the House is controlled by the Republicans it's a foregone conclusion that Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate, would become our next president.

On the VP side, the Senate would make the selection. Nominations would take place and the full Senate would then vote to determine who the next vice president would be.

Since the Senate is controlled by the Democrats, it's certain that a Democrat would be nominated and selected to serve as VP in the new Romney administration.

But, it's not certain that the senate would necessarily nominate and select Joe Biden for the VP slot. The Senate could essentially nominate anyone they choose. As the Senate majority leader, it's very possible that Harry Reid could submit himself as the nominee for the senate to vote on.

If this unlikely but entirely feasible scenario should play out, we could end up with a very awkward and stunning outcome as we the voters witness the swearing in of a Romney/Reid presidency on January 20, 2013.

RECENT VIDEOS