Abortion Advocate Gloria Steinem Condemns Violence

Feminist and reproductive rights activist Gloria Steinem once said, "A woman reading Playboy feels a little like a Jew reading a Nazi manual."  Similarly, women listening to Gloria Steinem talk about violence toward women should also feel "like a Jew reading a Nazi manual." Why? Because try as she might to be a voice exposing male violence against women, what Gloria Steinem really is, is an advocate for women being violent toward women. 

Recently, while marking the 40th anniversary of Ms. Magazine at the National Press Club, co-founder Gloria Steinem spewed her predictable anti-male animosity.  What Steinem was attempting to sell was the lie that "the home in our country is the single most dangerous place for a woman - not the street" and that ending domestic violence is "the key to world peace." 

Gloria based her premise on a number she gleaned from the Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics, which stated that from 2001 through 2005 intimate partners killed 5,861 women. 

Is Gloria Steinem unaware that mothers abort approximately 3,500 unborn children in America every day? That number amounts to about 1.2 million per year, which totals roughly 4.8 million from 2001 through 2005. Assuming half of those infants were female, that would tally to 2.4 million dead women in the same time frame Ms. Steinem used to make her initial point. 

Nice try, Gloria, but the womb is the "single most dangerous place for a woman" in America.

In the 1997 documentary entitled My Feminism, Steinem described the abortion she had at 22 years of age as a "pivotal and constructive experience." Clearly, what Gloria Steinem suggested was that violence is acceptable, even "positive and constructive," but only if the woman is committing murder in what Steinem later called an effort to "tak[e] responsibility for her own life." 

In a 2011 article written by Rachel Cook of The Guardian entitled "Gloria Steinem: 'I think we need to get much angrier,'" the woman with the seared conscience said that "[Abortion] is supposed to make us a bad person. But I must say, I never felt that. I used to sit and try and figure out how old the child would be, trying to make myself feel guilty. But I never could!"

As for how old Gloria's child would be today, let's do the math: ironically, if the fetus who was disposed of so coldly 56 years prior was female, she'd be the same age as many of the women applauding Gloria Steinem's feminist speech exposing male violence against women. 

Back at the National Press Club, Gloria's lamentation continued: "It's also still true that the average prison sentence for a partner, a male partner who kills his female partner, is less than for a woman who kills in self-defense in the home."

It was Gloria Steinem who once said, "A feminist is anyone who recognizes the equality and full humanity of women and men." Yet while discussing inequities toward women, she failed to mention that without the approval of the father, Roe v. Wade grants violent women the discretion to murder a man's child without explanation or consequence.

During her remarks, Steinem cited "Sex and World Peace," a book that claims to "unsettle a variety of assumptions in political and security discourse, demonstrating that the security of women is a vital factor in the security of the state and its incidence of conflict and war." 

Authors Hudson, Ballif-Spanvill, Caprioli, and Emmett maintain that world peace will be impossible to attain until men and women are treated alike and violence against women ends. Steinem concurs that in those areas "[t]here is the very long-term goal of understanding," and ending violence against the same women that Gloria believes should have the right to be violent against the unborn, "[i]s the key to world peace, hello?"

If it's really world peace and an end to violence that Ms. Steinem is after, maybe the aging activist should forego the advice given in "Sex and World Peace" and instead take some advice from another elderly female whose saintly life embodied everything Gloria Steinem's lacks: Mother Teresa of Calcutta. 

Mother Teresa understood what Gloria Steinem, despite all her years of fighting for women's rights, still hasn't grasped: "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other?" As for world peace, the beatified nun also taught that "Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want."  Hello?


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com








Feminist and reproductive rights activist Gloria Steinem once said, "A woman reading Playboy feels a little like a Jew reading a Nazi manual."  Similarly, women listening to Gloria Steinem talk about violence toward women should also feel "like a Jew reading a Nazi manual." Why? Because try as she might to be a voice exposing male violence against women, what Gloria Steinem really is, is an advocate for women being violent toward women. 

Recently, while marking the 40th anniversary of Ms. Magazine at the National Press Club, co-founder Gloria Steinem spewed her predictable anti-male animosity.  What Steinem was attempting to sell was the lie that "the home in our country is the single most dangerous place for a woman - not the street" and that ending domestic violence is "the key to world peace." 

Gloria based her premise on a number she gleaned from the Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics, which stated that from 2001 through 2005 intimate partners killed 5,861 women. 

Is Gloria Steinem unaware that mothers abort approximately 3,500 unborn children in America every day? That number amounts to about 1.2 million per year, which totals roughly 4.8 million from 2001 through 2005. Assuming half of those infants were female, that would tally to 2.4 million dead women in the same time frame Ms. Steinem used to make her initial point. 

Nice try, Gloria, but the womb is the "single most dangerous place for a woman" in America.

In the 1997 documentary entitled My Feminism, Steinem described the abortion she had at 22 years of age as a "pivotal and constructive experience." Clearly, what Gloria Steinem suggested was that violence is acceptable, even "positive and constructive," but only if the woman is committing murder in what Steinem later called an effort to "tak[e] responsibility for her own life." 

In a 2011 article written by Rachel Cook of The Guardian entitled "Gloria Steinem: 'I think we need to get much angrier,'" the woman with the seared conscience said that "[Abortion] is supposed to make us a bad person. But I must say, I never felt that. I used to sit and try and figure out how old the child would be, trying to make myself feel guilty. But I never could!"

As for how old Gloria's child would be today, let's do the math: ironically, if the fetus who was disposed of so coldly 56 years prior was female, she'd be the same age as many of the women applauding Gloria Steinem's feminist speech exposing male violence against women. 

Back at the National Press Club, Gloria's lamentation continued: "It's also still true that the average prison sentence for a partner, a male partner who kills his female partner, is less than for a woman who kills in self-defense in the home."

It was Gloria Steinem who once said, "A feminist is anyone who recognizes the equality and full humanity of women and men." Yet while discussing inequities toward women, she failed to mention that without the approval of the father, Roe v. Wade grants violent women the discretion to murder a man's child without explanation or consequence.

During her remarks, Steinem cited "Sex and World Peace," a book that claims to "unsettle a variety of assumptions in political and security discourse, demonstrating that the security of women is a vital factor in the security of the state and its incidence of conflict and war." 

Authors Hudson, Ballif-Spanvill, Caprioli, and Emmett maintain that world peace will be impossible to attain until men and women are treated alike and violence against women ends. Steinem concurs that in those areas "[t]here is the very long-term goal of understanding," and ending violence against the same women that Gloria believes should have the right to be violent against the unborn, "[i]s the key to world peace, hello?"

If it's really world peace and an end to violence that Ms. Steinem is after, maybe the aging activist should forego the advice given in "Sex and World Peace" and instead take some advice from another elderly female whose saintly life embodied everything Gloria Steinem's lacks: Mother Teresa of Calcutta. 

Mother Teresa understood what Gloria Steinem, despite all her years of fighting for women's rights, still hasn't grasped: "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other?" As for world peace, the beatified nun also taught that "Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want."  Hello?


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com








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