Gulf of Mexico Seafood Catch Has Rebounded to Its Highest Volume Since 1999

Bruce Thompson
Benjamin Alexander-Bloch of the New Orleans Times-Picayune reported this good news.

The National Marine Fisheries Service on Wednesday released fisheries statistics that show the 2011 seafood catch in the Gulf of Mexico rebounded to its highest volume since 1999. That's despite the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill that still has fishers fearing less seafood in local waters. Menhaden, often described as a keystone species showing and helping determine the viability of many local species, rose dramatically in Louisiana. It jumped from its 10-year average of about 900 million pounds of catch since 2001 to about 1.3 billion pounds in 2011. Sales of menhaden at Louisiana docks jumped from the $47.9 million average to $100 million.

This is quite a different result from what we were told would happen when the Deepwater Horizon accident spread millions of barrels of oil on the surface in 2010.  We were told that the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem would die. Are you beginning to feel you have been played for a fool by the White House?  

Could it be that the state and federal governments have found a jobs program that they just can't let expire after the work has been completed?  That explanation certainly fits their predilections.  Who ever heard of a government program ending on its own?

Benjamin Alexander-Bloch of the New Orleans Times-Picayune reported this good news.

The National Marine Fisheries Service on Wednesday released fisheries statistics that show the 2011 seafood catch in the Gulf of Mexico rebounded to its highest volume since 1999. That's despite the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill that still has fishers fearing less seafood in local waters. Menhaden, often described as a keystone species showing and helping determine the viability of many local species, rose dramatically in Louisiana. It jumped from its 10-year average of about 900 million pounds of catch since 2001 to about 1.3 billion pounds in 2011. Sales of menhaden at Louisiana docks jumped from the $47.9 million average to $100 million.

This is quite a different result from what we were told would happen when the Deepwater Horizon accident spread millions of barrels of oil on the surface in 2010.  We were told that the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem would die. Are you beginning to feel you have been played for a fool by the White House?  

Could it be that the state and federal governments have found a jobs program that they just can't let expire after the work has been completed?  That explanation certainly fits their predilections.  Who ever heard of a government program ending on its own?