Chick-fil-A wronged by media again

Rosslyn Smith
It pays never trust a news story these days.  Chick-fil-A's charitable foundation didn't back off supporting groups that oppose gay marriage because of pressure by big city politicians.  They had never supported any political groups to begin with. 

Anne Sorock of Legal Insurrection, the only person who seems to have done real reporting on this story, 
has this to say.

On Wednesday, I pointed out that all of these headlines seemed to be taking one group's press release-the Civil Rights Agenda-along with Alderman Moreno's comments in a Chicago Tribune article about a letter he received from the company, and printing them without checking their validity against the actual documents.

I did fact-check Alderman Moreno and the Civil Rights Agenda's press release on Wednesday. And when I did, I determined that, at best, we had no way to corroborate what they were saying; at worst, they were falsifying and spinning what was, in fact, no change whatsoever from Chick-fil-A's original corporate giving policy. The actual quote from the letter to Alderman Moreno:

The WinShape Foundations is now taking a much closer look at the organizations it considers helping, and in that process will remain true to its stated philosophy of not supporting organizations with political agendas. [emphasis added]

Funny how all the news stories across the nation missed that last little clause in their rush to proclaim a non-victory over the forces of non-hate. Nor did any of these so called news gathers seem to read Chick-fil-A's report Who We Are, which details their key charitable priorities. The three categories Chick-fil-A funds are creating educational opportunities for Chick-fil-A employees and other youth through scholarship programs and other educational activities; donating food to the needy, disaster relief workers plus members of the armed forces and their families; and developing youth and family/marriage enrichment programs through donations to outside groups as well as the related WinShape Foundation. The highly controversial organizations supported are, among others, more than a dozen major universities,  the USO, PGA Tour Charities, the United Way, the Salvation Army, several children's hospitals and care homes, the Atlanta Legal Aid Foundation and Care for AIDS Kenya. The closest thing to a hate group I could find in Who We Are  might be Junior Achievement.  The left certainly doesn't like the idea of teaching children how the free enterprise system is supposed to work.

I'll let Anne Sorock's words close

Alderman Moreno has once again thrust a company, one that wished to open in his ward and provide employment to his constituents, into the spotlight for his own personal gain. When will Alderman Moreno, and the woefully inattentive media that backs him up, be held accountable for their casual manipulation and mischaracterization of a private company?

It pays never trust a news story these days.  Chick-fil-A's charitable foundation didn't back off supporting groups that oppose gay marriage because of pressure by big city politicians.  They had never supported any political groups to begin with. 

Anne Sorock of Legal Insurrection, the only person who seems to have done real reporting on this story, 
has this to say.

On Wednesday, I pointed out that all of these headlines seemed to be taking one group's press release-the Civil Rights Agenda-along with Alderman Moreno's comments in a Chicago Tribune article about a letter he received from the company, and printing them without checking their validity against the actual documents.

I did fact-check Alderman Moreno and the Civil Rights Agenda's press release on Wednesday. And when I did, I determined that, at best, we had no way to corroborate what they were saying; at worst, they were falsifying and spinning what was, in fact, no change whatsoever from Chick-fil-A's original corporate giving policy. The actual quote from the letter to Alderman Moreno:

The WinShape Foundations is now taking a much closer look at the organizations it considers helping, and in that process will remain true to its stated philosophy of not supporting organizations with political agendas. [emphasis added]

Funny how all the news stories across the nation missed that last little clause in their rush to proclaim a non-victory over the forces of non-hate. Nor did any of these so called news gathers seem to read Chick-fil-A's report Who We Are, which details their key charitable priorities. The three categories Chick-fil-A funds are creating educational opportunities for Chick-fil-A employees and other youth through scholarship programs and other educational activities; donating food to the needy, disaster relief workers plus members of the armed forces and their families; and developing youth and family/marriage enrichment programs through donations to outside groups as well as the related WinShape Foundation. The highly controversial organizations supported are, among others, more than a dozen major universities,  the USO, PGA Tour Charities, the United Way, the Salvation Army, several children's hospitals and care homes, the Atlanta Legal Aid Foundation and Care for AIDS Kenya. The closest thing to a hate group I could find in Who We Are  might be Junior Achievement.  The left certainly doesn't like the idea of teaching children how the free enterprise system is supposed to work.

I'll let Anne Sorock's words close

Alderman Moreno has once again thrust a company, one that wished to open in his ward and provide employment to his constituents, into the spotlight for his own personal gain. When will Alderman Moreno, and the woefully inattentive media that backs him up, be held accountable for their casual manipulation and mischaracterization of a private company?