Voting fraud? Sometimes, it changes history

Democrats are crowding courtrooms across the country, fighting tooth and nail to eliminate reasonable laws to prevent fraud at the ballot box. As Byron York points out in the Examiner, sometimes, the consequences of voter fraud can change history: On the '08 campaign, Republican Sen. Norm Coleman was running for re-election against Democrat Al Franken. It was impossibly close; on the morning after the election, after 2.9 million people had voted, Coleman led Franken by 725 votes. Franken and his Democratic allies dispatched an army of lawyers to challenge the results. After the first canvass, Coleman's lead was down to 206 votes. That was followed by months of wrangling and litigation. In the end, Franken was declared the winner by 312 votes. He was sworn into office in July 2009, eight months after the election. During the controversy a conservative group called Minnesota Majority began to look into claims of voter fraud. Comparing criminal records with voting rolls, the...(Read Full Post)

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