Should Todd Akin withdraw from the Missouri Senate race?

Rick Moran
I wrote last night on PJ Media's Tatler that Akin's remarks about abortion and rape were among "the most ignorant and damaging statement I've ever heard a politician utter."

Explaining his no-exceptions policy on abortions, Akin was asked why he opposes abortion even when the pregnancy is the result of rape.

"First of all, from what I understand from doctors, (pregnancy from rape) is really rare," Akin told KTVI-TV in a clip posted to YouTube by the Democratic super PAC American Bridge. "If it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down."

Akin added: "But let's assume that maybe that didn't work or something. I think there should be some punishment, but the punishment ought to be on the rapist and not attacking the child."

Akin has since released a statement saying he "misspoke" -- but refuses to walk back the magical notion that "the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down" or define "legitimate" rape. Liberals are already trying to tie the top of the ticket to Akin's ignorant statement and GOP activists are up in arms.

A tweet from Patrick Ruffini:

By 80-1, GOP activists in my Twitter poll want Akin to step down as the nominee.

If the rape comment had been the only problem, there might be an argument he could make to stay in the race. But since the primary, Akin has put his foot in his mouth several times, referring to student loans as "socialism" and calling for an end to school lunch programs.

Clearly, not ready for prime time.

AT Political Correspondent Rich Baehr thinks that "the two candidates he beat in the primary, Steelman and Brunner, would each win easily." That's probably correct which is one more reason why Todd Akin should withdraw from the race.




I wrote last night on PJ Media's Tatler that Akin's remarks about abortion and rape were among "the most ignorant and damaging statement I've ever heard a politician utter."

Explaining his no-exceptions policy on abortions, Akin was asked why he opposes abortion even when the pregnancy is the result of rape.

"First of all, from what I understand from doctors, (pregnancy from rape) is really rare," Akin told KTVI-TV in a clip posted to YouTube by the Democratic super PAC American Bridge. "If it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down."

Akin added: "But let's assume that maybe that didn't work or something. I think there should be some punishment, but the punishment ought to be on the rapist and not attacking the child."

Akin has since released a statement saying he "misspoke" -- but refuses to walk back the magical notion that "the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down" or define "legitimate" rape. Liberals are already trying to tie the top of the ticket to Akin's ignorant statement and GOP activists are up in arms.

A tweet from Patrick Ruffini:

By 80-1, GOP activists in my Twitter poll want Akin to step down as the nominee.

If the rape comment had been the only problem, there might be an argument he could make to stay in the race. But since the primary, Akin has put his foot in his mouth several times, referring to student loans as "socialism" and calling for an end to school lunch programs.

Clearly, not ready for prime time.

AT Political Correspondent Rich Baehr thinks that "the two candidates he beat in the primary, Steelman and Brunner, would each win easily." That's probably correct which is one more reason why Todd Akin should withdraw from the race.