Barack Obama's Idea of Staying in the Word and Living Like Jesus

Prior to the election in 2008, then-candidate Barack Obama showed up in Rick Warren's Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California.  It was there that Warren asked Barack Obama what Christianity meant to him and this is how he answered:

As a starting point, it means I believe in - that Jesus Christ died for my sins, and that I am redeemed through him. That is a source of strength and sustenance on a daily basis. Yes, I know that I don't walk alone. And I know that if I can get myself out of the way, that I can maybe carry out in some small way what he intends. And it means that those sins that I have on a fairly regular basis, hopefully will be washed away.

But what it also means, I think, is a sense of obligation to embrace not just words, but through deeds, the expectations, I think, that God has for us. And that means thinking about the least of these.

Despite his "above my pay grade" answer to Rick Warren's controversial "when does life begin" question, Barack Obama went on to win the election. Over the last four years the President has not let his "sense of obligation" toward Jesus stand in the way of his continued support for abortion on demand as well as all manner of liberal social policy whose precepts are denounced, not extolled, by the God Obama claims to worship.

For instance, with all that "thinking about the least of these" Barack Obama claims he does, he sure hasn't given the helpless and defenseless unborn so much as a second thought. If the President's true goal is to "carry out in some small way what [Jesus] intends" surely he can't believe that it's the Lord's will for His followers to support or promote the destruction of God-ordained human life? 

Now it's less than three months until the next election and the President is again publicly espousing a deep commitment to his Christian faith.  Barack Obama, together with his opponent Mitt Romney, agreed to a faith-based interview, this time with Washington National Cathedral magazine.  

President Obama must think the American people will overlook his request that the Jesuit priests at Georgetown University cover up the IHS monogram before he would speak there, or that he mocked Christians as being people who exhibit "antipathy" toward others while clinging to guns and religion.

Could it be that in Barack's skewed understanding of Christianity, revoking the conscience clause for his Christian brethren who work in the medical field is how he "carries out in some small way" what he perceives to be what God intends?

In the "words and deeds" department, a Christian omitting the phrase "the Creator" when quoting the Declaration of Independence doesn't exactly jibe with Jesus' words: "Whoever acknowledges me before men, I will also acknowledge him before my Father in heaven."

The truth is, the president has not vacillated in the slightest in his support of the anti-biblical policy of government-funded abortion, and recently "evolved" to a place where he now has a favorable opinion of same-sex marriage too.

Nonetheless, in the interview, Obama, who faithfully upholds the premise that women should be in control over life and death, shared that he believes "at the end of the day, God is in control." God is either in control or He isn't - it can't be both ways. 

The President also shared that "I have a job to do as president, and that does not involve convincing folks that my faith in Jesus is legitimate and real." When Jesus walked the earth He made it quite clear that there is no need for convincing, because Jesus said, "a tree is known by its own fruit."  So if persuasion is necessary maybe it's because the fruit is, shall we say, questionable.

The problem is that in other ways Obama does plenty of "convincing."  The President's public profession of faith while approving and promoting blatant rebellion leads the impressionable to falsely believe a Christian is someone who quotes Scripture, supports Planned Parenthood, and officiates over same-sex marriage ceremonies.

And although he ignores his own flesh-and-blood brother George, who lives in a slum in Nairobi, the President expressed that his faith in God is directly tied to his belief in a compassionate role for government, saying, "From slavery to the suffrage movement to civil rights, faith - and the moral obligations that derive from our faith - have always helped us to navigate some of our greatest moral challenges with a recognition that there's something bigger than ourselves: we have obligations that extend beyond our own self-interest."

Does Obama grasp that "extending beyond our own self-interest" doesn't quite fit with the right-to-choose paradigm he so ardently defends and that "extending beyond our own self-interest" probably has more do with helping his impoverished brother George than providing free contraceptives to the likes of Democrat Convention speaker Sandra Fluke?

That aside, in the Washington Cathedral interview the President made what is likely to be the most astounding declaration about his faith thus far when he said, "I do my best to live out my faith, and to stay in the Word, and to make my life look more like His."

On the President's part, spiritual goals are always commendable. Unfortunately, his self-created walk of faith often leads him and those he influences into extremely dark places.  Moreover, the President accepts and rejects Scripture according to personal moral preferences.  He dissects God's Word and picks and chooses according to which verses he can use and manipulate to uphold reprobate liberal ideology.

This election year, maybe true people of faith should consider that regardless of how he perceives his walk with the Lord, Barack Obama is notorious for rejecting the hard sayings of the One he claims he wants his life to emulate.  As for the Scripture he says he's "staying in," according to the "Word made flesh," not accepting that Word in its entirety is synonymous with rejecting the Christ the President claims to follow

Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

Prior to the election in 2008, then-candidate Barack Obama showed up in Rick Warren's Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California.  It was there that Warren asked Barack Obama what Christianity meant to him and this is how he answered:

As a starting point, it means I believe in - that Jesus Christ died for my sins, and that I am redeemed through him. That is a source of strength and sustenance on a daily basis. Yes, I know that I don't walk alone. And I know that if I can get myself out of the way, that I can maybe carry out in some small way what he intends. And it means that those sins that I have on a fairly regular basis, hopefully will be washed away.

But what it also means, I think, is a sense of obligation to embrace not just words, but through deeds, the expectations, I think, that God has for us. And that means thinking about the least of these.

Despite his "above my pay grade" answer to Rick Warren's controversial "when does life begin" question, Barack Obama went on to win the election. Over the last four years the President has not let his "sense of obligation" toward Jesus stand in the way of his continued support for abortion on demand as well as all manner of liberal social policy whose precepts are denounced, not extolled, by the God Obama claims to worship.

For instance, with all that "thinking about the least of these" Barack Obama claims he does, he sure hasn't given the helpless and defenseless unborn so much as a second thought. If the President's true goal is to "carry out in some small way what [Jesus] intends" surely he can't believe that it's the Lord's will for His followers to support or promote the destruction of God-ordained human life? 

Now it's less than three months until the next election and the President is again publicly espousing a deep commitment to his Christian faith.  Barack Obama, together with his opponent Mitt Romney, agreed to a faith-based interview, this time with Washington National Cathedral magazine.  

President Obama must think the American people will overlook his request that the Jesuit priests at Georgetown University cover up the IHS monogram before he would speak there, or that he mocked Christians as being people who exhibit "antipathy" toward others while clinging to guns and religion.

Could it be that in Barack's skewed understanding of Christianity, revoking the conscience clause for his Christian brethren who work in the medical field is how he "carries out in some small way" what he perceives to be what God intends?

In the "words and deeds" department, a Christian omitting the phrase "the Creator" when quoting the Declaration of Independence doesn't exactly jibe with Jesus' words: "Whoever acknowledges me before men, I will also acknowledge him before my Father in heaven."

The truth is, the president has not vacillated in the slightest in his support of the anti-biblical policy of government-funded abortion, and recently "evolved" to a place where he now has a favorable opinion of same-sex marriage too.

Nonetheless, in the interview, Obama, who faithfully upholds the premise that women should be in control over life and death, shared that he believes "at the end of the day, God is in control." God is either in control or He isn't - it can't be both ways. 

The President also shared that "I have a job to do as president, and that does not involve convincing folks that my faith in Jesus is legitimate and real." When Jesus walked the earth He made it quite clear that there is no need for convincing, because Jesus said, "a tree is known by its own fruit."  So if persuasion is necessary maybe it's because the fruit is, shall we say, questionable.

The problem is that in other ways Obama does plenty of "convincing."  The President's public profession of faith while approving and promoting blatant rebellion leads the impressionable to falsely believe a Christian is someone who quotes Scripture, supports Planned Parenthood, and officiates over same-sex marriage ceremonies.

And although he ignores his own flesh-and-blood brother George, who lives in a slum in Nairobi, the President expressed that his faith in God is directly tied to his belief in a compassionate role for government, saying, "From slavery to the suffrage movement to civil rights, faith - and the moral obligations that derive from our faith - have always helped us to navigate some of our greatest moral challenges with a recognition that there's something bigger than ourselves: we have obligations that extend beyond our own self-interest."

Does Obama grasp that "extending beyond our own self-interest" doesn't quite fit with the right-to-choose paradigm he so ardently defends and that "extending beyond our own self-interest" probably has more do with helping his impoverished brother George than providing free contraceptives to the likes of Democrat Convention speaker Sandra Fluke?

That aside, in the Washington Cathedral interview the President made what is likely to be the most astounding declaration about his faith thus far when he said, "I do my best to live out my faith, and to stay in the Word, and to make my life look more like His."

On the President's part, spiritual goals are always commendable. Unfortunately, his self-created walk of faith often leads him and those he influences into extremely dark places.  Moreover, the President accepts and rejects Scripture according to personal moral preferences.  He dissects God's Word and picks and chooses according to which verses he can use and manipulate to uphold reprobate liberal ideology.

This election year, maybe true people of faith should consider that regardless of how he perceives his walk with the Lord, Barack Obama is notorious for rejecting the hard sayings of the One he claims he wants his life to emulate.  As for the Scripture he says he's "staying in," according to the "Word made flesh," not accepting that Word in its entirety is synonymous with rejecting the Christ the President claims to follow

Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

RECENT VIDEOS