Support for Obamacare ticks up after SCOTUS decision

Rick Moran
Frankly, I'm surprised the jump in support wasn't larger. Many Americans respect the Supreme Court and even with a decision like the one last Thursday, tend to see SCOTUS as the final judge in matters Constitutional. The fact that sentiment to repeal the law has actually gotten stronger at the same time support has also grown, would seem to indicate that some voters actually favor repeal but respect the Court's decision.

Reuters:

Among all registered voters, support for the law rose to 48 percent in the online survey conducted after Thursday's ruling, up from 43 percent before the court decision. Opposition slipped to 52 percent from 57 percent.

The survey showed increased backing from Republicans and, crucially, the political independents whose support will be essential to winning the November 6 presidential election.

Thirty-eight percent of independents supported the healthcare overhaul. That was up from 27 percent from a Reuters/Ipsos poll taken days before the justices' ruling. Opposition among independents was 62 percent, versus 73 percent earlier.

[...]

Republican opposition to the law stayed strong, if somewhat weaker than before the high court ruled. Eighty-one percent of Republicans opposed it in the most recent survey, down from 86 percent in the poll conducted June 19-23. In the earlier poll, 14 percent of Republicans supported the healthcare plan, compared to 19 percent in the more recent one.

Illustrating the political polarization on the issue, three-quarters of Democrats backed the law, the same as a week earlier. One quarter opposed it.

The two top Republicans in Congress vowed on Sunday to push ahead with efforts to repeal the law despite the Supreme Court upholding it, but the White House said it is time to stop fighting and start implementing it.

In some good news for Republicans, the Supreme Court ruling is energizing opposition to the 2010 healthcare law.

In the new poll, more than half of all registered voters - 53 percent - said they were more likely to vote for their member of Congress if he were running on a platform calling for repeal, up from 46 percent before the ruling.

"This is galvanizing both sides," Clark said.

Some Democrats claim that if the GOP is successful in repealing Obamacare, a voter backlash would ensue damaging them in 2014. I think this poll - and other taken after the SCOTUS decision - show pretty much the opposite. A majority wouldn't mind seeing the law repealed while a solid plurality hate it so much that it will damage Democrats who resist repeal.

But will Obamacare be a major issue in this year's election? It seems that way now but time has a tendency to cool tempers and by election day, it will probably still be an important issue, but the race won't turn on a candidate's position.


Frankly, I'm surprised the jump in support wasn't larger. Many Americans respect the Supreme Court and even with a decision like the one last Thursday, tend to see SCOTUS as the final judge in matters Constitutional. The fact that sentiment to repeal the law has actually gotten stronger at the same time support has also grown, would seem to indicate that some voters actually favor repeal but respect the Court's decision.

Reuters:

Among all registered voters, support for the law rose to 48 percent in the online survey conducted after Thursday's ruling, up from 43 percent before the court decision. Opposition slipped to 52 percent from 57 percent.

The survey showed increased backing from Republicans and, crucially, the political independents whose support will be essential to winning the November 6 presidential election.

Thirty-eight percent of independents supported the healthcare overhaul. That was up from 27 percent from a Reuters/Ipsos poll taken days before the justices' ruling. Opposition among independents was 62 percent, versus 73 percent earlier.

[...]

Republican opposition to the law stayed strong, if somewhat weaker than before the high court ruled. Eighty-one percent of Republicans opposed it in the most recent survey, down from 86 percent in the poll conducted June 19-23. In the earlier poll, 14 percent of Republicans supported the healthcare plan, compared to 19 percent in the more recent one.

Illustrating the political polarization on the issue, three-quarters of Democrats backed the law, the same as a week earlier. One quarter opposed it.

The two top Republicans in Congress vowed on Sunday to push ahead with efforts to repeal the law despite the Supreme Court upholding it, but the White House said it is time to stop fighting and start implementing it.

In some good news for Republicans, the Supreme Court ruling is energizing opposition to the 2010 healthcare law.

In the new poll, more than half of all registered voters - 53 percent - said they were more likely to vote for their member of Congress if he were running on a platform calling for repeal, up from 46 percent before the ruling.

"This is galvanizing both sides," Clark said.

Some Democrats claim that if the GOP is successful in repealing Obamacare, a voter backlash would ensue damaging them in 2014. I think this poll - and other taken after the SCOTUS decision - show pretty much the opposite. A majority wouldn't mind seeing the law repealed while a solid plurality hate it so much that it will damage Democrats who resist repeal.

But will Obamacare be a major issue in this year's election? It seems that way now but time has a tendency to cool tempers and by election day, it will probably still be an important issue, but the race won't turn on a candidate's position.