Opinion of SCOTUS falls following Obamacare decision

A new CNN poll shows that Americans have a higher opinion of the Supreme Court following the Obamacare decision.

The poll also showed a virtual tie between those who agree with the decision and those who don't.

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold the national health care law may not have changed many minds regarding the controversial measure, but a new poll indicates it sure did change Americans views of the high court.

According to a CNN/ORC International survey released Monday, the public is divided on last week's ruling, with 50% saying they agree with the Supreme Court's decision and 49% saying they disagree. And there is the expected partisan divide, with more than eight in ten Democrats agreeing with the decision, more than eight in ten Republicans disagreeing, and independent voters divided, with 52% disagreeing and 47% agreeing.

ut what have changed are perceptions of the high court. "As recently as April, Republicans and Democrats had virtually identical positive opinions on the Supreme Court. But not any more," adds Holland. "That's the biggest change that the court decision has created."

The court's approval rating among Democrats jumped by 23 points; to 73%. Among Republicans, it fell by 21 points, to 31%. Approval of the Supreme Court among independents edged up five points, to 53%.

Not surprisingly, opinions of Chief Justice John Roberts are also divided along partisan lines, with a majority of Democrats holding a favorable view of him compared to only three in ten Republicans. But more than a third of all Americans are unsure how they view Roberts, probably a result of the low profile that he and his colleagues have kept for many years. Roberts sided with the liberals on the high court to uphold the law.

Overall, three in ten say the high court is too liberal, with 22% saying it's too conservative and 46% saying it's about right.

There is still a wellspring of support and respect for the court even among conservatives. A lot of the opinion about Obamacare now is colored with the belief that the court has spoken and we should all move on. This accounts for most of the surge in support for Obamacare generally and the mandate in particular. That, and the fact that SCOTUS ruled it constitutional is important to some people.



A new CNN poll shows that Americans have a higher opinion of the Supreme Court following the Obamacare decision.

The poll also showed a virtual tie between those who agree with the decision and those who don't.

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold the national health care law may not have changed many minds regarding the controversial measure, but a new poll indicates it sure did change Americans views of the high court.

According to a CNN/ORC International survey released Monday, the public is divided on last week's ruling, with 50% saying they agree with the Supreme Court's decision and 49% saying they disagree. And there is the expected partisan divide, with more than eight in ten Democrats agreeing with the decision, more than eight in ten Republicans disagreeing, and independent voters divided, with 52% disagreeing and 47% agreeing.

ut what have changed are perceptions of the high court. "As recently as April, Republicans and Democrats had virtually identical positive opinions on the Supreme Court. But not any more," adds Holland. "That's the biggest change that the court decision has created."

The court's approval rating among Democrats jumped by 23 points; to 73%. Among Republicans, it fell by 21 points, to 31%. Approval of the Supreme Court among independents edged up five points, to 53%.

Not surprisingly, opinions of Chief Justice John Roberts are also divided along partisan lines, with a majority of Democrats holding a favorable view of him compared to only three in ten Republicans. But more than a third of all Americans are unsure how they view Roberts, probably a result of the low profile that he and his colleagues have kept for many years. Roberts sided with the liberals on the high court to uphold the law.

Overall, three in ten say the high court is too liberal, with 22% saying it's too conservative and 46% saying it's about right.

There is still a wellspring of support and respect for the court even among conservatives. A lot of the opinion about Obamacare now is colored with the belief that the court has spoken and we should all move on. This accounts for most of the surge in support for Obamacare generally and the mandate in particular. That, and the fact that SCOTUS ruled it constitutional is important to some people.



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