Liberal fish squirms in Michael's Bloomberg's liberal net

J. James Estrada
Businessman Seth Goldman, a self-proclaimed "entrepreneur with a public-service orientation," has a piece in the Wall Street Journal complaining about New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's social engineering of the NYC Health Code. Specifically, Goldman is upset with Bloomberg's edict that bans the sale of any sugar-sweetened drink that offers more than 16 ounces per portion.  You see, Goldman operates the beverage company Honest Tea and his bottle is 16.9 ounces.

Government edicts in the public marketplace have become common during the Obama administration, but what happens when liberals who make money in said marketplace get caught up in the self-righteous liberal net of we-know-what's-best-for-you? They squirm like so many fish grabbed from the pools of freedom.

Here is Goldman squirming:

One response we considered was putting 0.9 ounce less liquid in our bottles, but that would create a separate set of complications. We fill our bottles to the brim-not just because we like to deliver an "Honest" value, but also to ensure quality since we do not use preservatives. Then there is the costly prospect of having to change all of our UPC codes (those complicated black bars found on every product on a grocery shelf) because we would be offering a different liquid volume-all for 0.9 ounces!

And what if next year, Cambridge, Mass., comes up with a ban on 15.5-ounce containers? As soon as government starts getting between us and the consumer, we quickly find ourselves considering scenarios that are not based on market realities or consumer needs.

The old adage of follow the money comes to mind when reading this. As in, follow the money flowing to Mitt Romney's campaign coffers.  A lot of it, we suspect, will be flowing in from businessmen who were formerly on the Left like Mr. Goldman.

 

Mr. Estrada is a current Gilbert, Arizona Justice of the Peace candidate

 

Businessman Seth Goldman, a self-proclaimed "entrepreneur with a public-service orientation," has a piece in the Wall Street Journal complaining about New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's social engineering of the NYC Health Code. Specifically, Goldman is upset with Bloomberg's edict that bans the sale of any sugar-sweetened drink that offers more than 16 ounces per portion.  You see, Goldman operates the beverage company Honest Tea and his bottle is 16.9 ounces.

Government edicts in the public marketplace have become common during the Obama administration, but what happens when liberals who make money in said marketplace get caught up in the self-righteous liberal net of we-know-what's-best-for-you? They squirm like so many fish grabbed from the pools of freedom.

Here is Goldman squirming:

One response we considered was putting 0.9 ounce less liquid in our bottles, but that would create a separate set of complications. We fill our bottles to the brim-not just because we like to deliver an "Honest" value, but also to ensure quality since we do not use preservatives. Then there is the costly prospect of having to change all of our UPC codes (those complicated black bars found on every product on a grocery shelf) because we would be offering a different liquid volume-all for 0.9 ounces!

And what if next year, Cambridge, Mass., comes up with a ban on 15.5-ounce containers? As soon as government starts getting between us and the consumer, we quickly find ourselves considering scenarios that are not based on market realities or consumer needs.

The old adage of follow the money comes to mind when reading this. As in, follow the money flowing to Mitt Romney's campaign coffers.  A lot of it, we suspect, will be flowing in from businessmen who were formerly on the Left like Mr. Goldman.

 

Mr. Estrada is a current Gilbert, Arizona Justice of the Peace candidate