The wolves are circling the Obama campaign

Dana Milbank has a good summation of what he calls Obama's "Junius Horribilis":

Job growth has stalled, the Democrats have been humiliated in Wisconsin, the attorney general is facing a contempt-of-Congress citation, talks with Pakistan have broken down, Bill Clinton is contradicting Obama, Mitt Romney is outraising him, Democrats and Republicans alike are complaining about a "cascade" of national-security leaks from his administration, and he is now on record as saying that the "private sector is doing fine."

Could it get any worse?

Early Monday morning, Obama learned that it could. His aides delivered the news to him that his commerce secretary had been cited for a felony hit-and-run after allegedly crashing his car three times over the weekend.

[...]

For the White House, it was just the latest entry in the when-it-rains-it-pours ledger. This has been one of the worst stretches of the Obama presidency. In Washington, there is a creeping sense that the bottom has fallen out and that there may be no second term. Privately, senior Obama advisers say they are no longer expecting much economic improvement before the election.

Carney had the unenviable task of confronting the full arsenal of gloom at Monday afternoon's briefing.

The press, like a pack of wolves, is circling the injured Obama campaign, snapping and growling before moving in for the kill:

The AP asked about the president's unfortunate private-sector-is-fine remark. The Reuters correspondent asked about the economic "head winds" from Europe. Ed Henry of Fox News Channel asked about the looming contempt-of-Congress vote against Attorney General Eric Holder. Margaret Talev of Bloomberg News asked about the Supreme Court striking down Obamacare. Norah O'Donnell of CBS News asked about calls for a special prosecutor to probe leaks. Victoria Jones of Talk Radio News asked about the stalled talks with Pakistan.

Carney sought relief by calling on TV correspondents from swing states, but the one from Wisconsin asked about the failed attempt to recall Republican Gov. Scott Walker and the one from Nevada asked about her state's unemployment rate, the nation's highest.

Nothing about hope and change. Nothing about Republican "obstructionism" or how "unreasonable" the GOP is. The Obama campaign is spinning out of control. They are off message, panicked, confused, and unequipped to deal with the avalanche of problems confronting America and the world.

It's not that Obama has "lost" the press. That won't happen. Instead, the media is simply following the story which this week - as it was last week - is the tale of how the Obama campaign is in complete disarray and they have no idea how to get the mojo back.

Besides, even they may be a little afraid that these clueless gits have no idea how to proceed and no concrete plans to keep us from descending into the pit of economic morass and another recession.

Dana Milbank has a good summation of what he calls Obama's "Junius Horribilis":

Job growth has stalled, the Democrats have been humiliated in Wisconsin, the attorney general is facing a contempt-of-Congress citation, talks with Pakistan have broken down, Bill Clinton is contradicting Obama, Mitt Romney is outraising him, Democrats and Republicans alike are complaining about a "cascade" of national-security leaks from his administration, and he is now on record as saying that the "private sector is doing fine."

Could it get any worse?

Early Monday morning, Obama learned that it could. His aides delivered the news to him that his commerce secretary had been cited for a felony hit-and-run after allegedly crashing his car three times over the weekend.

[...]

For the White House, it was just the latest entry in the when-it-rains-it-pours ledger. This has been one of the worst stretches of the Obama presidency. In Washington, there is a creeping sense that the bottom has fallen out and that there may be no second term. Privately, senior Obama advisers say they are no longer expecting much economic improvement before the election.

Carney had the unenviable task of confronting the full arsenal of gloom at Monday afternoon's briefing.

The press, like a pack of wolves, is circling the injured Obama campaign, snapping and growling before moving in for the kill:

The AP asked about the president's unfortunate private-sector-is-fine remark. The Reuters correspondent asked about the economic "head winds" from Europe. Ed Henry of Fox News Channel asked about the looming contempt-of-Congress vote against Attorney General Eric Holder. Margaret Talev of Bloomberg News asked about the Supreme Court striking down Obamacare. Norah O'Donnell of CBS News asked about calls for a special prosecutor to probe leaks. Victoria Jones of Talk Radio News asked about the stalled talks with Pakistan.

Carney sought relief by calling on TV correspondents from swing states, but the one from Wisconsin asked about the failed attempt to recall Republican Gov. Scott Walker and the one from Nevada asked about her state's unemployment rate, the nation's highest.

Nothing about hope and change. Nothing about Republican "obstructionism" or how "unreasonable" the GOP is. The Obama campaign is spinning out of control. They are off message, panicked, confused, and unequipped to deal with the avalanche of problems confronting America and the world.

It's not that Obama has "lost" the press. That won't happen. Instead, the media is simply following the story which this week - as it was last week - is the tale of how the Obama campaign is in complete disarray and they have no idea how to get the mojo back.

Besides, even they may be a little afraid that these clueless gits have no idea how to proceed and no concrete plans to keep us from descending into the pit of economic morass and another recession.

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