The Battle of Midway at 70

Vincent Agnelli
After the famous air raid on Japan on April 18, 1942 led by then Colonel James Doolittle and his squadron of B-25 bomber, launched from the USS Hornet, a series of events were set into motion.  One being from our newly found war foe Japan and her military leadership and the other from one very keen and history enriched Admiral Chester Nimitz.  In what was to be the largest ever sea battle in size and scope known to man, the results would yield the writing of world history for 70 years to come.  However, how much longer will that battle be relevant to world history?

It has always surprised me how this nation's media has always weighed far more heavily the D-Day invasion that took place two years after Midway.  Had we blundered or had the wrong Admiral been in place at the time to make use of the slight but tested intelligence, we could have fallen for the elaborate feint in the Aleutian Islands or held back to protect a suspected threat against Hawaii or the West Coast.  We might have been caught in those traps with an inferior force and history may have been flowed in just the opposite direction, where we would have lost both Hawaii and the West Coast of the United States.  Without a dramatic and concise victory and the use of intelligence before it aged beyond usefulness, there would have been no saving Europe, and the United States would have found itself looking quite different from today, as it no doubt would have been controlled by an axis power.

Another matter, which has slipped the minds of some of the greatest historians, is the fact that Mexico had reversed its stance on the Embargo to the Axis powers in 1940 and was making deals with Germany, Japan, and Russia for its oil supply.  Mexico was lining up to be on the side of the Axis Powers.  Had Japan bested us at Midway, the Mexican Government could have easily been emboldened to allow Axis powers to move up from their positions in South America and in from Japan to squeeze the United States into a war here on our own soil.  We would have been fighting Yamamoto from behind blades of grass as he once quipped in regard to Americans' rights to own guns.

The irony of the end of World War 2 is that it was not the end of centralized governance and tyranny.  To every American who sacrificed their lives or gave of themselves completely and unselfishly I offer my thanks for what you did.  To those of you who are veterans that are still with us today from World War 2, I want you to know you are not forgotten by all us.  There are many of us who do know our history and are preparing to save our nation based on that history you helped to write, 70 years ago.

A toast to "Point Luck" and the heroes of the United States Navy!

                                                             United States                           Japan

Casualties                                                 307                                      2,500

After the famous air raid on Japan on April 18, 1942 led by then Colonel James Doolittle and his squadron of B-25 bomber, launched from the USS Hornet, a series of events were set into motion.  One being from our newly found war foe Japan and her military leadership and the other from one very keen and history enriched Admiral Chester Nimitz.  In what was to be the largest ever sea battle in size and scope known to man, the results would yield the writing of world history for 70 years to come.  However, how much longer will that battle be relevant to world history?

It has always surprised me how this nation's media has always weighed far more heavily the D-Day invasion that took place two years after Midway.  Had we blundered or had the wrong Admiral been in place at the time to make use of the slight but tested intelligence, we could have fallen for the elaborate feint in the Aleutian Islands or held back to protect a suspected threat against Hawaii or the West Coast.  We might have been caught in those traps with an inferior force and history may have been flowed in just the opposite direction, where we would have lost both Hawaii and the West Coast of the United States.  Without a dramatic and concise victory and the use of intelligence before it aged beyond usefulness, there would have been no saving Europe, and the United States would have found itself looking quite different from today, as it no doubt would have been controlled by an axis power.

Another matter, which has slipped the minds of some of the greatest historians, is the fact that Mexico had reversed its stance on the Embargo to the Axis powers in 1940 and was making deals with Germany, Japan, and Russia for its oil supply.  Mexico was lining up to be on the side of the Axis Powers.  Had Japan bested us at Midway, the Mexican Government could have easily been emboldened to allow Axis powers to move up from their positions in South America and in from Japan to squeeze the United States into a war here on our own soil.  We would have been fighting Yamamoto from behind blades of grass as he once quipped in regard to Americans' rights to own guns.

The irony of the end of World War 2 is that it was not the end of centralized governance and tyranny.  To every American who sacrificed their lives or gave of themselves completely and unselfishly I offer my thanks for what you did.  To those of you who are veterans that are still with us today from World War 2, I want you to know you are not forgotten by all us.  There are many of us who do know our history and are preparing to save our nation based on that history you helped to write, 70 years ago.

A toast to "Point Luck" and the heroes of the United States Navy!

                                                             United States                           Japan

Casualties                                                 307                                      2,500