New Hampshire town will have expenses for Obama campaign trip paid for

I blogged about this story yesterday - a New Hampshire town was stuck with $20,000 in police overtime expenses because the Obama campaign had scheduled an appearance.

It now appears that an anonymous donor has stepped forward and will pay the police overtime:

An anonymous donor has offered the town of Durham, N.H., $20,000 to help cover the local security expenses of President Obama's visit there today.

Local governments are responsible for certain police and fire expenses when a president comes to visit; Obama's trip has become a source of local criticism because he is holding a campaign event in Durham, not an official presidential one.

"The issue of proper compensation for public services from any political candidate is a matter for discussion at a future Town Council meeting," said Town Council Chairman Jay Gooze, reports the Portsmouth (N.H.) Herald.

It's a common problem for local governments that receive political visits, especially in tough economic times.

Durham estimates it will pay about $16,500 in extra police expenses today, and $3,100 in fire protection.

It doesn't solve the general problem of how these small towns will pay for these events. But for Obama, the donation lances a boil that made them look bad.

I blogged about this story yesterday - a New Hampshire town was stuck with $20,000 in police overtime expenses because the Obama campaign had scheduled an appearance.

It now appears that an anonymous donor has stepped forward and will pay the police overtime:

An anonymous donor has offered the town of Durham, N.H., $20,000 to help cover the local security expenses of President Obama's visit there today.

Local governments are responsible for certain police and fire expenses when a president comes to visit; Obama's trip has become a source of local criticism because he is holding a campaign event in Durham, not an official presidential one.

"The issue of proper compensation for public services from any political candidate is a matter for discussion at a future Town Council meeting," said Town Council Chairman Jay Gooze, reports the Portsmouth (N.H.) Herald.

It's a common problem for local governments that receive political visits, especially in tough economic times.

Durham estimates it will pay about $16,500 in extra police expenses today, and $3,100 in fire protection.

It doesn't solve the general problem of how these small towns will pay for these events. But for Obama, the donation lances a boil that made them look bad.

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