Mainstream Media Ignore Major ObamaCare Protest

On June 8, 2012 many thousands of people took to the nation's streets to protest the Obamacare contraceptive mandates and to support religious freedom in the United States. The mainstream media hardly covered the protest.

The turnout in Chicago was in a conservative estimation about 1,500, although others estimates make the turnout to be about 3,500. A significant fact about the demonstrators was that they ranged from children to adults. Entire families were there. Furthermore, there were delegations from local Catholic parish that gave the event the flavor of a church picnic.

At the core of the protest were Catholic groups, many of them conservative Catholics from Chicago and families that home schooled their children.

St. John Cantius parish in Chicago made a dramatic entrance with yellow balloons on polls that broadcast the word "Life." Notably absent were TV cameras and members of the press to do interviews.

Whether or not this demonstration can be turned into votes for the Republican candidate for US President remains to be seen. The organizers of the event did not allow political signs, but you could sense the crowd was not inclined to vote Democrat.

The few demonstrators I interviewed said they were going back to their local parishes and persuade their friends to vote Republican.

One boy, not old enough to vote, summed up the feeling of many there. He held up a homemade sign that asked, "Obama: Religiophobe?"

I asked him if he made the sign himself.

"No," he proudly answered, "My Mom did."

Many left the rally with the feeling that something significant is churning in the belly of America, and the mainstream media does not have a clue as to what it is.

Robert Klein Engler lives in Des Plaines, Illinois, a city northwest of Chicago, first settled in 1835.

On June 8, 2012 many thousands of people took to the nation's streets to protest the Obamacare contraceptive mandates and to support religious freedom in the United States. The mainstream media hardly covered the protest.

The turnout in Chicago was in a conservative estimation about 1,500, although others estimates make the turnout to be about 3,500. A significant fact about the demonstrators was that they ranged from children to adults. Entire families were there. Furthermore, there were delegations from local Catholic parish that gave the event the flavor of a church picnic.

At the core of the protest were Catholic groups, many of them conservative Catholics from Chicago and families that home schooled their children.

St. John Cantius parish in Chicago made a dramatic entrance with yellow balloons on polls that broadcast the word "Life." Notably absent were TV cameras and members of the press to do interviews.

Whether or not this demonstration can be turned into votes for the Republican candidate for US President remains to be seen. The organizers of the event did not allow political signs, but you could sense the crowd was not inclined to vote Democrat.

The few demonstrators I interviewed said they were going back to their local parishes and persuade their friends to vote Republican.

One boy, not old enough to vote, summed up the feeling of many there. He held up a homemade sign that asked, "Obama: Religiophobe?"

I asked him if he made the sign himself.

"No," he proudly answered, "My Mom did."

Many left the rally with the feeling that something significant is churning in the belly of America, and the mainstream media does not have a clue as to what it is.

Robert Klein Engler lives in Des Plaines, Illinois, a city northwest of Chicago, first settled in 1835.

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