Fewer women believe there is a widespread attack on women's reproductive rights

Rick Moran
More than three in ten women think that there is a GOP war on women's reproductive rights, according to the latest Kaiser poll. A larger percentage - 42% - believe that some groups want to limit these rights, but that there is no widespread effort to deny them.

Three in ten women (31 percent) overall believe that there is currently a "wide-scale effort to limit women's reproductive health choices and services, such as abortion, family planning, and contraception" in the U.S.  A larger share (45 percent) say there are some groups that would like to limit women's reproductive health choices and services but it is not a wide-scale effort, while others volunteer that no such effort exists (7 percent) or decline to offer an opinion (17 percent).

For many women, women's reproductive health issues resonate on a personal level, with 42 percent reporting that they took some action in the past six months in reaction to something they've seen, heard or read. This includes attempting to influence a friend or family member's opinion (23 percent), donating money to a non-profit working on reproductive health issues (15 percent), and contacting an elected official (14 percent).

For now, female voters (like male voters) continue to focus on the economy above all else as an election issue, with several other issues (including health care generally) rising above women's reproductive health.  Six in ten women voters name the economy and/or jobs as the issue they'd most like to hear about from candidates, compared to just 5 percent who name women's health or other women's issues (including abortion). 

Those 31% of women were going to vote Democratic anyway, so it hardly matters in the long run. This is especially true when you consider that most women see the issue as a sideshow to the economy.

The poll shows the stupidity of the "war on women" campaign, as most women either don't believe it or don't care.

What about the popularity of Obamacare?

In asking about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the share of the public with a favorable view of ACA dropped 5 percentage points this month, with unfavorable views now outnumbering  favorable ones by a small margin (44 percent versus 37 percent).  The idea of defunding the law, as discussed by some members of Congress, is as unpopular now as it was a year ago, with roughly six in ten (58 percent) saying they disapprove of cutting off funding as a way to stop some or all of the law from being put into place, and about a third (32 percent) saying they approve of this strategy.

The Kaiser poll has consistently shown Obamacare to be more popular than it proves to be in other polls, so this drop of 5 points in a month is significant.

They may not have to take a poll on Obamacare next month if, as expected, SCOTUS rules in a couple of weeks on the law's constitutionality.

More than three in ten women think that there is a GOP war on women's reproductive rights, according to the latest Kaiser poll. A larger percentage - 42% - believe that some groups want to limit these rights, but that there is no widespread effort to deny them.

Three in ten women (31 percent) overall believe that there is currently a "wide-scale effort to limit women's reproductive health choices and services, such as abortion, family planning, and contraception" in the U.S.  A larger share (45 percent) say there are some groups that would like to limit women's reproductive health choices and services but it is not a wide-scale effort, while others volunteer that no such effort exists (7 percent) or decline to offer an opinion (17 percent).

For many women, women's reproductive health issues resonate on a personal level, with 42 percent reporting that they took some action in the past six months in reaction to something they've seen, heard or read. This includes attempting to influence a friend or family member's opinion (23 percent), donating money to a non-profit working on reproductive health issues (15 percent), and contacting an elected official (14 percent).

For now, female voters (like male voters) continue to focus on the economy above all else as an election issue, with several other issues (including health care generally) rising above women's reproductive health.  Six in ten women voters name the economy and/or jobs as the issue they'd most like to hear about from candidates, compared to just 5 percent who name women's health or other women's issues (including abortion). 

Those 31% of women were going to vote Democratic anyway, so it hardly matters in the long run. This is especially true when you consider that most women see the issue as a sideshow to the economy.

The poll shows the stupidity of the "war on women" campaign, as most women either don't believe it or don't care.

What about the popularity of Obamacare?

In asking about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the share of the public with a favorable view of ACA dropped 5 percentage points this month, with unfavorable views now outnumbering  favorable ones by a small margin (44 percent versus 37 percent).  The idea of defunding the law, as discussed by some members of Congress, is as unpopular now as it was a year ago, with roughly six in ten (58 percent) saying they disapprove of cutting off funding as a way to stop some or all of the law from being put into place, and about a third (32 percent) saying they approve of this strategy.

The Kaiser poll has consistently shown Obamacare to be more popular than it proves to be in other polls, so this drop of 5 points in a month is significant.

They may not have to take a poll on Obamacare next month if, as expected, SCOTUS rules in a couple of weeks on the law's constitutionality.