Egypt's Mubarak sentenced to life in prison

Rick Moran
From the looks of him at his appearances in court, it will be a fairly short sentence.

Reuters:

An Egyptian judge convicted former president Hosni Mubarak of complicity in the killings of protesters during the uprising that ended his 30-year rule and sentenced him on Saturday to life in prison.

It was the first time a deposed Arab leader had faced an ordinary court in person since a wave of uprisings shook the Arab world last year, sweeping away four entrenched rulers.

The ruling came at a politically fraught time for Egypt, two weeks before a run-off in its first free presidential election that will pit the Muslim Brotherhood, which was banned under Mubarak, against the deposed autocrat's last prime minister.

Mubarak, propped up on a hospital stretcher and wearing dark sunglasses, heard the verdict with a stony expression. He had been wheeled into the cage used in Egyptian courtrooms, while the other defendants stood.

Demonstrators outside the court, many of whom had been demanding the death penalty for Mubarak, greeted the verdict with fireworks and cries of "Allahu akbar (God is great)".

Mubarak will be transferred from a military hospital where he is being treated for cancer to a prison hospital. No word has been given about his condition or his prognosis.

Does this end the Mubarak era? His one time prime minister Ahmed Shafiq is facing off in the presidential runoff later this month with the Brotherhood's Mohamed Mursi. Are the people more terrified of bringing back military-backed autocratic rule or are they more scared at the prospect of the Muslim Brotherhood controlling the country?

Some choice.

From the looks of him at his appearances in court, it will be a fairly short sentence.

Reuters:

An Egyptian judge convicted former president Hosni Mubarak of complicity in the killings of protesters during the uprising that ended his 30-year rule and sentenced him on Saturday to life in prison.

It was the first time a deposed Arab leader had faced an ordinary court in person since a wave of uprisings shook the Arab world last year, sweeping away four entrenched rulers.

The ruling came at a politically fraught time for Egypt, two weeks before a run-off in its first free presidential election that will pit the Muslim Brotherhood, which was banned under Mubarak, against the deposed autocrat's last prime minister.

Mubarak, propped up on a hospital stretcher and wearing dark sunglasses, heard the verdict with a stony expression. He had been wheeled into the cage used in Egyptian courtrooms, while the other defendants stood.

Demonstrators outside the court, many of whom had been demanding the death penalty for Mubarak, greeted the verdict with fireworks and cries of "Allahu akbar (God is great)".

Mubarak will be transferred from a military hospital where he is being treated for cancer to a prison hospital. No word has been given about his condition or his prognosis.

Does this end the Mubarak era? His one time prime minister Ahmed Shafiq is facing off in the presidential runoff later this month with the Brotherhood's Mohamed Mursi. Are the people more terrified of bringing back military-backed autocratic rule or are they more scared at the prospect of the Muslim Brotherhood controlling the country?

Some choice.